The Updated Concussion Law in New York

As of July 1st the state of New York’s law on concussions is in full effect.  The key provisions are not un-similar to other states and include: each school coach, athletic trainer, nurse and PE teacher must take a course on concussions, suspected concussions will result in immediate removal, and anyone with a concussion cannot return to activity in less than 24 hours and MUST have a physician clear them.

WSYR of Syracuse, New York had a segment on the topic a couple of days ago, and you might notice the individual interviewed in the piece, non other than Dr. Don Brady – follower and commenter on this blog (click on link to see video);

According to experts like psychologist Dr. Don Brady, as many as 40% of kids prematurely return to play a sport after getting a concussion. “Think of a concussion as a sprained brain,” explained Dr. Brady. “You don’t ask someone who sprains their ankle to go out and see if their ankle’s okay and run around the track a couple of times to see how much better it is. You tell them to rest, period. We don’t do that with concussions.”

Dr. Brady says brain damage occurs when the brain ricochets in the skull after an impact.

“Basically, the brain is moving in the skull when Continue reading

Advertisements

WSYR Report on Concussions

This news piece by WSYR in Syracuse, New York examines the concussion issue.

Skaneateles football player Ben Epolitto was returning a kickoff when his concussion occurred. It was caused by a helmet-to-helmet hit with an opposing player. “I went black for a second. I was really dazed,” he said. “I realized after the game I had a throbbing headache.”

Epolitto didn’t report his injury, however, and continued to play. “I didn’t even know what I was doing,” he said.

Thanks for the heads up from Syracuse Hockey Mom’s Network.

If you allow the video to continue to roll you will see other pieces on concussions.

A side note, we had the privilege of having Dr. Brian Rieger out to our area in 2008 for a Concussion Discussion as a keynote speaker.  His information and trailblazing work in the state of New York should be called upon more often.