#TheFIFA5 A Recap by Snedaker

Although the news of a concussion lawsuit is not really “new” anymore the fact that it was brought against FIFA was “earth-shattering” in terms of news.  Sure, the football leagues and even the NCAA have been targets, but for soccer to get the proverbial target painted on its back has really shook up the sporting world.  It was big enough news that it was in national sports casts and even was termed “breaking news” in corners of the world.

Perhaps the beginning of football season here in America has swept away most of its “front burner” power; it is mindful to take a look at what this law suit is all about.  Mind you, it is not your normal litigation.  Below is a wonderful recap of #TheFIFA5 suit being brought forth, submitted by Katherine Snedaker-Price (it appears on her blog pinkconcussions.com):

This summary is based on information posted on the Hagens Berman S Shapiro LLP website and is my unofficial review of the lawsuit I have hash tagged as #TheFIFA5. NOTE: I am not a lawyer, and am merely outlining the suit as I read it. I welcome comments and thoughts.

On August 27, 2014, a Class-Action Lawsuit Filed Against FIFA, U.S. Youth Soccer Over Concussions made headlines. This lawsuit pits three mothers and two female college students vs FIFA, soccer’s worldwide governing body—the Fèdèration Internationale de Football Association (FIFA)—and affiliated soccer organizations in the United States

  • US Soccer Federation
  • U.S. Youth Soccer + American Youth Soccer (over 3 US million child and adolescent soccer players)

Note: In 2013, FIFA reported $1.386 billion in revenue.  The 2014 World Cup brought FIFA $1.2 billion from U.S. broadcasters. This lawsuit states FIFA has failed to enact the policies and rules needed to protect soccer players. FIFA and the others mentioned…

  1. Failed to adopt effective policies to evaluate and manage concussions, at all levels of the game
  2. Lacked of effective policies poses a greater danger to women and children players, who may more vulnerable to traumatic and long-lasting brain injury
  3. Ignored medical community called for changes over a decade ago
  4. Ignored simple, best-practice guidelines, which have been updated three times since the initial international conference on concussions (FIFA even hosted)

FIFA has made progress…  Continue reading

Advertisements

Vonn Now Saying Right Things

As we discussed last Friday, Lindsey Vonn had suffered a concussion in a training run leading up to the Finals of the World Cup.  We were concerned with how her and her team were handling the issue, however the tune has changed, for the better.  Vonn is now saying what all professional athletes should be;

“The second I have a headache or focus problems, I’m going to stop,” Vonn said. “I want to be really careful from here on out. It’s a pretty bad sign that I had symptoms again after the super-G, which means that I’m not recovered yet, so I’m not going to take any chances.

“This is a dangerous downhill, and if I don’t feel like I can focus then I’m not going to do it.””The second I have a headache or focus problems, I’m going to stop,” Vonn said. “I want to be really careful from here on out. It’s a pretty bad sign that I had symptoms again after the super-G, which means that I’m not recovered yet, so I’m not going to take any chances.

“This is a dangerous downhill, and if I don’t feel like I can focus then I’m not going to do it.”

Another good sign is US Woman’s ski team doctor, William Sterret, is also saying all the right things and making her recovery very transparent for all to see;

“If there are positive symptoms – things like nausea or headache or feeling like you’re in a fog – any of those things, then you’re shut down for sure,” Sterett told The AP. “Once these symptoms become negative, then we go onto more cognitive testing – balance, memory, repetition – things that are easily defined and measured.

“Again, if you don’t pass that then you’re done again. Once you pass that, then we take a step backwards to the subjective test list and try to slowly increase the stress or exertion on an athlete.”

Hey HOCKEY, get a clue!!!

SOURCE