Concussion Information from UB

Dr. John J. Ledy performed a webinar for the Brain Injury Association of New York State.  It is a very interesting topic; how to utilize controlled exercise in concussion recovery.  This video was published on YouTube by BIANYS, it is over an hour in length but like most stuff I put on here it is worth the listen.

Again this falls under the mantra “none of us is as smart as all of us.”

Advertisements

Concussion – After Injury Care

Most cases of concussion resolve spontaneously over time, we have had discussions on here that vary from 72 hours to 6 months or longer – however, people/researchers are trying to find a way to help along recovery.  Most of this is an inexact science, to say the least, it is almost the ol’ adage of “throw crap on the wall and see if it sticks.”

Lindsay Barton wrote a great summation of current ideas for therapy for lingering effects of concussion, in some cases being classified as PCS, or post concussion syndrome, for Mom’s Team.  I do like his list which includes;

  • Craniosacral therapy
  • Chiropractic Neurology
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Amantadine
  • “Buffalo Protocol”
  • Epsom Salts

The first three are very “hands on” Continue reading

Return-to-Play Test?

Perhaps.  University of Buffalo doctors and researchers believe that they may have a tool that can provide definitive answers and take the “chance” out of the impending second injury.  John J. Leddy, MD, Karl Kozlowski, PhD and Barry Willer, PhD are authors of a study aimed at just doing that;

University at Buffalo researchers have developed a test to determine when it’s safe for athletes to return to play after a concussion.

Currently no standardized method exists to assess when the time is right. It is usually a judgment call made by team physicians.

“We believe this new approach could change the way professional and amateur sports team physicians make decisions about concussion recovery.”
Barry Willer, PhD
professor of psychiatry and rehabilitation medicine and senior author on the paper

The treadmill test devised by UB concussion specialists in the Department of Orthopedics could change that by providing a systematic approach to evaluate readiness.

“In the past, how a team physician and trainer made this decision was left to chance,” says Barry Willer, PhD, professor of psychiatry and rehabilitation medicine.

Willer is senior author of a paper titled Reliability of a Graded Exercise Test for Assessing Recovery from Concussion, published in the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine.

Using the Balke standardized treadmill test the subjects were taken to either symptom exacerbation or perceived exhaustion.  Starting Continue reading