Finally Addressing Adcademic Concerns of Concussions

This one is a very good seminar for anyone who deals with school aged children and once again it is free.  This event will be put on by the CDC and the most poignant part is the academic and return to school concerns when dealing with the brain injury known as concussion.  It has been my opinion that not only have the parents and schools underplayed the seriousness of returning to school with a brain injury, the medical community has been behind as well.  Brain health will need to be though of as physical health going forward.  Not only is stressing the cognitive parts of the brain while injured a problem, the most overlooked portion of school is something Don Brady has been the champion of, the emotional wellness of the brain/individual.

Get yourself registered, set a reminder on your phone (just tell Siri) and take notes; parents especially.

==========

CDC Heads Up to Schools Webinar for Schools Professionals

Tuesday, August 7, 2012 at 2:00 – 3:00 PM EST.

Click below to register for a FREE CDC webinar on concussion in schools (K-12): https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3354303556335213312

This webinar will help you:  

  • Learn the signs, symptoms and effects of a concussion on students K-12.
  • Know how to prevent and respond to concussions in school.
  • Explore school-wide approaches to addressing concussion.
  • Learn ways to support individual students returning to school after a concussion.

Invited presenters include:

 

Julie Haarbauer-Krupa, Ph.D.

B.R.A.I.N. Program Coordinator

Children’s Health Care of Atlanta

 

Karen McAvoy, Psy.D

Director of the R.E.A.P Program

Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children

 

CDC is dedicated to improving the lives of Americans and keeping them safe from injury. Through the Heads Up program, CDC provides information on preventing, recognizing, and responding to concussion, and more serious brain injuries.

For more information, visit www.cdc.gov/Concussion.

Advertisements

Tuesday Quick Hits

When will people and doctors understand that not only do repeat traumas to the brain while still recovering from an initial injury make the sequelae prolonged and worse, but returning to school will do the same?  As we have said over and over on this blog and in my many public speaking appearances removal from school and other cognitive activities is a MUST;

Drawing is just about all the 14-year-old high school freshman can do right now. He can’t play video games, watch TV, or use his cell phone said his mom, Michelle Hensley-Shelton. He can’t even go to school.

“He can listen to some soft music,” she said.

Michelle said it’s all because Hunter is recovering from concussions.

“Definitely two but the doctors at Baptist say that it could have been three or four,” said Michelle.

Michelle said they happened while Hunter was playing JV football. The first happened in August when Hunter was knocked out for a few seconds in practice.

“It was a pretty hard impact he took. He come down on his shoulder and he kind of went up and messed with his neck,” she said.

Hunter got checked out at the hospital and while he didn’t go back to practice for a few weeks, he did go back to school the next day.

“We learned one of the first things we probably should have done with his first concussion is not only keep him away from athletics for a few weeks, but his brain needed time to heal from schoolwork, as well,” said Michelle.

SOURCE

==========

Q: What exactly is tau protein and why does it matter in the concussion issue?

A: Normally occurring protein in the brain with a function, but in overabundance it has been implicated in CTE; Continue reading