Launching National Study of Female Athletes and Concussions

Here is a press release from Kathrine Price Snedaker and Pinkconcussions.com

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Press Release

For Release: Wednesday, September 18, 2013 
Launch of National Study of Female Athletes and Concussions
Study begins October 1, to explore Female Athletes’ Experiences with Concussions
Contact:
Katherine Snedaker, MSW, PinkConcussions.com / 203-984-0860 PinkConcussions@gmail.com
Dr. Jimmy Sanderson, Clemson University / 864-656-3996 jsande6@clemson.edu

Norwalk, CT – Men’s football concussions are in the news daily from former and current players, but there’s rarely news about female athletes’ experiences with concussions. Female athletes experience a significant number of concussions, yet they seem too often overlooked when concussions are discussed in mainstream media. Mentioned in the report American Medical Society for Sports Medicine Position Statement: Concussion in Sport 2012data suggest that in sports with similar rules female athletes sustain more concussions than their male counterparts. In addition, female athletes experience or report a higher number and severity of symptoms as well as a longer duration of recovery than male athletes in several studies.

This new study will be focused on female athletes from all sports, and their past and present experiences with concussions. Current and former athletes are eligible for this study conducted by researchers from Clemson University with the advocacy group, Pink Concussions. For this study, female athletes, age 18 and over, who are willing to participate can sign up now at PinkConcussions.com. On October 1, participants will be emailed a link to a twenty-minute online survey about their experiences with sports and non-sport concussions and reporting concussions.

This research study will also explore female athletes’ experiences with reporting concussions, another salient avenue in the concussions dialogue, as many athletes do not report concussions willingly or are mis-diagnosed.

The research also will investigate female athletes’ willingness to have genetic testing that may show links to the repair and recovery of brain cells after concussion. After finishing the survey, participants in the study can opt for an additional study and consider submitting DNA collected by a cheek swab to be tested for variants at the Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene.  Testing for certain genes has previously documented an association between specific genetic factors and outcomes from injuries such as concussion.

Apolipoprotein E is a protein that is important in the repair and recovery of brain cells that have been damaged due to concussion. The clinical studies point to a relationship between certain genetic signatures and poorer overall concussion response. While additional evidence is needed to better understand the relationship between APOE status and concussion outcomes, the American Academy of Neurology introduced APOE testing into concussion management guidelines this year.  EDIT FROM AAN: The American Academy of Neurology did not “introduce APOE testing into concussion management guidelines this year.”  The AAN stated that apoE4 was a risk factor for cognitive impairment in professionals; but no recommendation was made to conduct apoE testing, and there was no evidence reviewed regarding apoE4 in amateurs. 

The results of this research will help further concussion research by focusing on the communicative element present in this issue, and the results of the study will be helpful for athletes, parents, administrators, physicians, and advocates. This research will be beneficial in shedding light on female athletes’ experiences with concussions and reporting concussions. Often female athletes are omitted from the public discourse surrounding concussions and the results of this research will assist concussion advocates in raising more awareness about concussion issues in sports.

Co-Researchers in this study are Dr. Jimmy Sanderson and Dr. Melinda Weathers in the Department of Communication Studies at Clemson University, along with Ms. Katherine Snedaker, MSW, of PinkConcussions.com.

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For more information about this study, help in recruiting athletes or to participate in the study, please fill the contact form at PinkConcussions.com or contact:

Dr. Jimmy Sanderson
Clemson University
864-656-3996
Katherine Snedaker
203-984-0860
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What Are the Experts Saying About Guardian Caps

This post has no intention of being inflammatory, rather it is a post designed to hold a conversation and create a counter point.  I have been bombarded with information regarding this product; since early 2011 I have not been “on board” with this.  It is important to note that this product and its PR firm have been good at communicating with me and have listened, but I do find some of the press regarding this product and similar ones is a bit off base.  We do need to understand that what reporters and people say – not affiliated with the product – cannot be controlled buy the company.  So that being said I have found and have some opinions on the recent spike of press.  Take it for what you want.  Just know that I am trying to provide information for everyone to make their own decisions.

It began in 2011 rolling into 2012 when Guardian Caps shot me an email about their product.  And from the beginning I was not sold on the promises or the theory.  It’s quite simple in my estimation; you can wrap an egg up in 45 pounds of bubble wrap and if you shake it hard enough the yolk will still move or even break.  Essentially that is a concussion in an “egg-shell”.  Sure, the bubble wrap will stop all linear forces from cracking the shell and even prevent it from moving with those linear forces, but what is it doing to for the acceleration and deceleration of the concussion?  Moreover, even though it may be very light, we are adding mass to the head, thus we are creating a fulcrum change and balance change.  If you read here enough you know what I am talking about.

However, I have seen fellow athletic trainers rave about this and plenty of teams/coaches/schools adopt this product and even consult me on it, so I thought I would do my best to get the most information possible, on my own.  This company was willing to provide me with all the information they thought I needed, so good for them.  It really came to a head recently, while in the midst of the NOCSAE statement on 3rd party add-on’s, I received this email from the company;

Dustin,

I wanted to drop a line about both the Aug 9th article “NOCSAE Press Release Clarifies” and a short picture of our product and company as a whole.  Thanks for all your hard work with The Concussion Blog.  It is a valuable resource and you do a great job presenting an educated, unbiased view.

About NOCSAE certification:

  • If companies want to sell equipment that alters the original tested/certified helmet THEY or the individual must re-certify each helmet model it is placed on – adult and youth separate but not sizes.