#pinkTBI Summit 2016: A recap

pinktbiThe meeting at Georgetown University this past weekend was more than fruitful for this athletic trainer. I went in trying to get two things done: one, provide info to you the follower as best as possible and move along the discussion on female concussion and two, to learn something that is applicable to me as a “boot on the ground” athletic trainer.

The first was probably painfully obvious that I accomplished if you follow on Twitter and didn’t mute me and were not interested in this event (you should have been interested). The second objective I did meet by learning some techniques when working with females, not only at incident but with recovery, education and overall attitude.

Certainly I could write 4000 words on this event but that would be boring to you and I am still recovering from the weekend the the docs there asked that I “rest” my fingers. That being said I will give quick synopsis’s of each speaker, info that I took away as an athletic trainer and advocate for education about mTBI/concussion. It is entirely possible that I misrepresented some thoughts and missed some very valuable info for some out there; don’t worry speakers and audience this was done the best possible.

Lets begin, and this will be in chronological order of the event with presenters last name, in bullet form. My hope is that you will use this as furthering your info about the female sequale and in some cases change how you treat.

  • Kerr:
    • The concussion rate is higher in females in males in college and high school sports, particularly in basketball, soccer, and softball/baseball.
    • Research suggests differences in symptoms reported as well as RTP.
    • More research needed at the youth level.
  • Covassin:
    • Showed that neck strength is a confounding effect on possible injury.
    • MOI is different in the sexes: males contact with player while female is contact with ground/equipment.
  • Lincoln:
    • Exposed us to the lacrosse injury and problems that exist, which is important because this is an emerging sport.
    • No head gear in woman’s lacrosse.
  • Casswell:
    • Impact sensors and injury and how it may relate to injury.
    • Different types of injury for females vs. males (building on Covassin).
  • Colantonio:
    • Logitudial study showed about 24% of female pop has had mTBI.
    • Females seek and get less care overall.
    • Reproductive impact after a mTBI need to be understood.
  • Gioa:
    • Static and dynamic symptoms are different in female vs. males – needs research.
    • Academic performance shows no difference between sexes.  Continue reading
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International Summit on Female Concussions and TBI

I am very excited to inform you and implore you to attend this first of its kind conference. Katherine Snedaker – a good friend and ally – along with her planning committee have done a wonderful job of creating a great place to discuss a subset of this head injury issue.

The International Summit on Female Concussions and TBI will be held a month from now at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. This summit is unique because this will only be about sex and gender-based research on females, from pediatrics to the elderly.

As much as we think we know about head injuries and concussions we don’t know squat, globally. Let alone in one gender over the other; females have been painfully overlooked/lack of attention because most of the noise and spotlight is on male dominated sports. Although, females choose to play many of the collision sports (rugby, hockey, lacrosse) there are other issues we know that impact females differently.

The summit is over two days and will eventually culminate in a consensus statement about female issues surrounding and within the concussion paradigm. This is also going to be a first of its kind, and appreciated at least from me.

The Topics (briefly summarized):

  • Menstrual Phase and its impact
  • Age and Sex and its impact on symptoms
  • Domestic Violence
  • Female Soldiers
  • Pediatrics
  • Female Sport Concussions
  • Concussion Recovery male vs. female
  • Female RIO Data
  • Clinical Spectroscopy of Female brain
  • Return to School
  • Social Interactions
  • Ice Skaters
  • Psychology of Concussoin
  • And more

Here are the presenters, moderators and planning committee members (as of this post):  Continue reading

#TheFIFA5 A Recap by Snedaker

Although the news of a concussion lawsuit is not really “new” anymore the fact that it was brought against FIFA was “earth-shattering” in terms of news.  Sure, the football leagues and even the NCAA have been targets, but for soccer to get the proverbial target painted on its back has really shook up the sporting world.  It was big enough news that it was in national sports casts and even was termed “breaking news” in corners of the world.

Perhaps the beginning of football season here in America has swept away most of its “front burner” power; it is mindful to take a look at what this law suit is all about.  Mind you, it is not your normal litigation.  Below is a wonderful recap of #TheFIFA5 suit being brought forth, submitted by Katherine Snedaker-Price (it appears on her blog pinkconcussions.com):

This summary is based on information posted on the Hagens Berman S Shapiro LLP website and is my unofficial review of the lawsuit I have hash tagged as #TheFIFA5. NOTE: I am not a lawyer, and am merely outlining the suit as I read it. I welcome comments and thoughts.

On August 27, 2014, a Class-Action Lawsuit Filed Against FIFA, U.S. Youth Soccer Over Concussions made headlines. This lawsuit pits three mothers and two female college students vs FIFA, soccer’s worldwide governing body—the Fèdèration Internationale de Football Association (FIFA)—and affiliated soccer organizations in the United States

  • US Soccer Federation
  • U.S. Youth Soccer + American Youth Soccer (over 3 US million child and adolescent soccer players)

Note: In 2013, FIFA reported $1.386 billion in revenue.  The 2014 World Cup brought FIFA $1.2 billion from U.S. broadcasters. This lawsuit states FIFA has failed to enact the policies and rules needed to protect soccer players. FIFA and the others mentioned…

  1. Failed to adopt effective policies to evaluate and manage concussions, at all levels of the game
  2. Lacked of effective policies poses a greater danger to women and children players, who may more vulnerable to traumatic and long-lasting brain injury
  3. Ignored medical community called for changes over a decade ago
  4. Ignored simple, best-practice guidelines, which have been updated three times since the initial international conference on concussions (FIFA even hosted)

FIFA has made progress…  Continue reading

Return To Learn Conference

TINY FINALTime is running short for this conference as well, but I thought I would provide another opportunity for people to gain valuable information in the dynamic concussion issue.  A friend of the blog, Katherine Snedaker, is putting on a novel conference; based around the return to learn aspect of concussions.

NORWALK, JAN. 12, 2013 – Katherine Snedaker, MSW and Founder of Pink Concussions, an international social media organization focused on research and resources for female concussions from sports, accidents or military service, and SportsCAPP, a Concussion Education, Advocacy and Policy Group, has announced the dates for The Concussion Conference: Connecticut: Return to School THEN Return to Learn.

The Conference will take place on Thursday January 30th, 2014 at Chelsea Piers Connecticut in Stamford, and then repeat with the same format on Friday, January 31, 2014, at Quinnipiac  University School of Medicine in North Haven, CT.

To register, see http://www.TheConcussionConference.com and to follow on Twitter use #CTBrain.

The Concussion Conference will provide training sessions for school nurses, school staff, pediatricians, athletic trainers, and parents on how best to help children return to school and continue  to heal after concussions.

The Conference daytime training sessions will feature multiple national speakers including Brenda Eagan Brown who is co-author the new 2013 CDC Resource: Helping Students Recover from a Concussion: Classroom Tips for Teachers. Also presenting is Dr. Mike Lee, co-author of the newly issued American Academy of Pediatrics’ report, Returning to Learning Following a Concussion.

You can find the remainder of the Full Press Release HERE.

This event will be on the heels of the Brewer Sports International #C4CT Concussion Summit in NYC.  I wanted to be there as a presenter and as a friend, alas my duty as an athletic trainer will not allow me to do so.  I encourage people and press who have the time to make the Connecticut events as this is a new angle that Katherine is attempting.

In addition to Brenda Eagan Brown, attendees can listen to addresses from Alan Goldberger and TJ Quinn among others, you can find the speaker list HERE.

You can register for the conference HERE.

 

Katherine Snedaker: Parent Advocate – Sportscapp.com

Photo by Julia Arstrop Photography 2011I was asked to post this on The Concussion Blog, in full.  I appreciate what another Parent Advocate is doing for raising the awareness of concussions.  Katherine is doing a fine job and checking in on her is a must.

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10 ways to lower your Child’s Concussion Risk

BY Katherine Snedaker of www.Sportscapp.com ON June 20, 2012 

Concussions are a part of youth sports at every level from elementary school years to college. Playing at the local playground, riding bikes or just being a kid can put your child at risk for a concussion. However,  any parent can reduce their child’s risk of concussion with some simple steps:

1. Educate yourself on the signs and symptoms of a concussion along with the other members of your family so that an educated adult is always available during a practice or a game or by phone for your child to call.  Always check in with your child on the car ride home from any sporting activity or play date, and ask their day, and how they are feeling. If your child complains that he/she hit their head, you should  know the correct questions to ask to see if there could be an issue with a head injury.

2. Educate your child about concussions. There are simple, painless videos for the media savvy teenager of today. Studies show that kids are more likely to report concussions when they know what a concussion is. The earlier the diagnosis, the sooner a child can begin the rest needed to heal a concussion.

3. Check your child’s sports equipment at the beginning, middle and end of each season. While there is Continue reading