#TheFIFA5 A Recap by Snedaker

Although the news of a concussion lawsuit is not really “new” anymore the fact that it was brought against FIFA was “earth-shattering” in terms of news.  Sure, the football leagues and even the NCAA have been targets, but for soccer to get the proverbial target painted on its back has really shook up the sporting world.  It was big enough news that it was in national sports casts and even was termed “breaking news” in corners of the world.

Perhaps the beginning of football season here in America has swept away most of its “front burner” power; it is mindful to take a look at what this law suit is all about.  Mind you, it is not your normal litigation.  Below is a wonderful recap of #TheFIFA5 suit being brought forth, submitted by Katherine Snedaker-Price (it appears on her blog pinkconcussions.com):

This summary is based on information posted on the Hagens Berman S Shapiro LLP website and is my unofficial review of the lawsuit I have hash tagged as #TheFIFA5. NOTE: I am not a lawyer, and am merely outlining the suit as I read it. I welcome comments and thoughts.

On August 27, 2014, a Class-Action Lawsuit Filed Against FIFA, U.S. Youth Soccer Over Concussions made headlines. This lawsuit pits three mothers and two female college students vs FIFA, soccer’s worldwide governing body—the Fèdèration Internationale de Football Association (FIFA)—and affiliated soccer organizations in the United States

  • US Soccer Federation
  • U.S. Youth Soccer + American Youth Soccer (over 3 US million child and adolescent soccer players)

Note: In 2013, FIFA reported $1.386 billion in revenue.  The 2014 World Cup brought FIFA $1.2 billion from U.S. broadcasters. This lawsuit states FIFA has failed to enact the policies and rules needed to protect soccer players. FIFA and the others mentioned…

  1. Failed to adopt effective policies to evaluate and manage concussions, at all levels of the game
  2. Lacked of effective policies poses a greater danger to women and children players, who may more vulnerable to traumatic and long-lasting brain injury
  3. Ignored medical community called for changes over a decade ago
  4. Ignored simple, best-practice guidelines, which have been updated three times since the initial international conference on concussions (FIFA even hosted)

FIFA has made progress…  Continue reading

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Nick Mercer: Heading the blame away from goal

“Football is a simple game; 22 men chase a ball for 90 minutes and at the end, the Germans always win.” – Gary Lineker

Sunday’s game was scoreless into the 112th minute, but still an exciting one with an attacking, offensive mindset for both teams. That said, I am not writing this post to give an unqualified analysis of the final. I am not even analyzing FIFA’s approach to concussions. Everyone who watched saw Christoph Kramer collapse after colliding with Ezequiel Garay’s shoulder. This was a particularly nasty collision, but by no means the only, or even most, blatant example of brain injury in this World Cup. Not a week before, Argentina midfielder, Javier Mascherano also received a decidedly hard blow to the head after colliding with Dutch midfielder, Georginio Wijnaldum. Then there’s Uruguay’s Alvaro Pereira who was actually knocked out before continuing to play!

Another incident caught my attention in Sunday’s final when Germany’s Thomas Müller banged heads with an Argentine defender as they both attempted to head the ball. The defender (I don’t know who it was) was down for a while after they collided and Müller was reaching for his head. Nevertheless, as is now customary, both continued to play.

Blame seems ridiculous, since it can rationally be shifted around in a never-ending circle. It’s pointless for the same reasons. Yes, teams and doctors could do more. Yes, FIFA could write new rules. Yes, players should be taught the dangers of continuing to play. They should be taught this from a young age. The blame goes to ‘them’ and ‘they’, but what about ‘us’?

Personally, I enjoy watching football (or soccer, as we North Americans say), but I watch very little, especially compared to harder hitting American football – where men in full body armour slam into each other and brain injury seemingly occurs every play. Hockey is the same; full body armour, collisions, brain injury. People seem to forget what protection all of the padding provides. When two athletes collide without padding it hurts a lot more (that’s why padding is used) and it hurts both individuals. It also means that in rugby or Aussie Rules Football, where such padding isn’t used, there is a tendency more toward technique, not trying to lay the opponent out every play, because a hard collision is a hard collision for both athletes. But I digress.

Injury in sports and life will happen. Brain injury in sports and life will happen. It’s not about how brain injury is dealt with in sports, it’s about how it’s dealt with in life. Pressure is placed on governing bodies like FIFA, the NFL, the NHL to do something. As the top bodies of their respective sports, they set standards to strive for. Consequences don’t start and end there. The onus is on the rest of us to be aware and learn.

Tottenham Hotspurs; More Like Tottenham Hotmess

The center of the club soccer world resides in England (two teams in Wales) with the Barclay’s Premiere League (BPL).  Being the “best” soccer league has allowed the BPL to be televised live here in the States as the sport is showing some growth in participation and in viewership.  I have recently found myself watching more matches and even choosing “a side” – as they call it across the pond (it should be noted that soccer it called football everywhere else but here).  Through research and general information gathering as I get further into the sport the BPL or other European soccer leagues are not much different in its fandom.  Supporters of teams and players are similar to the fanatics that follow football here in America; critical of team play, ownership, players effort and results.  One area where the fans and the sport of soccer is well behind, in terms of knowledge, is concussions.

The readers of this blog know quite well that a concussion is simply an event that alters normal brain function.  Being primarily subjective it may be hard to distinguish a concussion by simply looking at a player or person.  However, the vast majority of sports fans here in America and participants know that there are tell-tale signs of concussion that cannot be disputed.  When one of those objective signs is observed it is and should be understood that said player was concussed and requires immediate removal from the game/practice/activity.  The reason is simple, concussions are a brain injury and bad.  Research has shown that playing through a concussion is very detrimental to short-term and long-term mental health.

Years ago, pre-2004, getting knocked out or displaying signs of a concussion was a mere nuisance and even a “badge of honor” among the top-level sporting participants.  It was known back then that something as obvious as someone losing consciousness was not a good thing for the younger participants, however it wasn’t looked upon as it is now.  When a sports participant absorbs enough force to effectively “reboot” the body’s central nervous system that is NOT A GOOD thing.  As the information about concussion has become more clear through the years if a player is KO’ed that player is removed from play immediately and does not return for the period determined by the medical staff.  In the NFL the soonest anyone has returned to practice or game after being knocked out, since 2010 has been six days.  Even that may not be enough time for the brain to recover.  Heck, in boxing and MMA, fighters that are KO’ed are medically suspended for 90 days.

This leads me to the bloody mess that occurred in Everton, England yesterday.  Continue reading