U of Mich New Video about Education Module

There are many places that provide modules for concussion education.  One of the newest entries in this area is the University of Michigan and Michigan NeuroSport.  Watch this video and once again see an example from a high school athlete.

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Tuesday Quick Hits

When will people and doctors understand that not only do repeat traumas to the brain while still recovering from an initial injury make the sequelae prolonged and worse, but returning to school will do the same?  As we have said over and over on this blog and in my many public speaking appearances removal from school and other cognitive activities is a MUST;

Drawing is just about all the 14-year-old high school freshman can do right now. He can’t play video games, watch TV, or use his cell phone said his mom, Michelle Hensley-Shelton. He can’t even go to school.

“He can listen to some soft music,” she said.

Michelle said it’s all because Hunter is recovering from concussions.

“Definitely two but the doctors at Baptist say that it could have been three or four,” said Michelle.

Michelle said they happened while Hunter was playing JV football. The first happened in August when Hunter was knocked out for a few seconds in practice.

“It was a pretty hard impact he took. He come down on his shoulder and he kind of went up and messed with his neck,” she said.

Hunter got checked out at the hospital and while he didn’t go back to practice for a few weeks, he did go back to school the next day.

“We learned one of the first things we probably should have done with his first concussion is not only keep him away from athletics for a few weeks, but his brain needed time to heal from schoolwork, as well,” said Michelle.

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Q: What exactly is tau protein and why does it matter in the concussion issue?

A: Normally occurring protein in the brain with a function, but in overabundance it has been implicated in CTE; Continue reading

AAN: “A New Game Plan for Concussion”

The American Academy of Neurology has defined a more comprehensive stance when dealing with concussions.  The AAN released a position statement regarding the initial management of concussions, last November;

1. Any athlete who is suspected to have suffered a concussion should be removed from participation until he or she is evaluated by a physician with training in the evaluation and management of sports concussions.

2. No athlete should be allowed to participate in sports if he or she is still experiencing concussion symptoms.

3. Following a concussion, a neurologist or physician with proper training should be consulted prior to clearing the athlete for return to participation.

4. A certified athletic trainer should be present at all sporting events, including practices, where athletes are at risk for concussion.

5. Education efforts should be maximized to improve the understanding of concussion by all athletes, parents, and coaches.

Neurology Now a publication for “healthy living for parents and their families” has published an article by Kate Gamble that takes a closer look at why the statement was made.  With the back drop of new and expanding research along with stories like Tommy Mallon Gamble interviews the likes of Dr. Julian Bailes and Dr. Jeffery Kutcher to explain why we need to readjust the stigma of concussions; Continue reading