Hot And Heavy Monday

With Rob Gonkowski and Wes Welker injuries there is a ton a debate today on the interwebs about concussions and other injuries in the NFL.  I figured I would link up some information that would help with the background and even further thinking for the topic de jour.  It would also help if you read my editorial on Everyone Pumping Their Brakes.

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1st for posterity sake, here is the current NFL Concussion Protocol, found at the NFL Players Association website.  It is worth reviewing and I am sure the NFLPA is monitoring this closely.

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2nd is a link to Concussion Myths from Nationwide Children’s.  Although aimed at youth participants and parents, these myths are very prevalent all the way up to the professional ranks.  One would assume that it should not be predicated there, but alas it is.  Read this and pass it along to all that you know concerned about concussions.

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3rd is a link to some very interesting research about ACL injuries.  It seems the authors are thinking that cognitively impaired individuals (females in this research), may be predisposed to ACL injuries.  I just came across this but it makes logical sense to me.  Here is why; part of a concussive episode the brain can be effected in a way that impairs your spatial awareness and reaction time.  This research could be a waterfall for expected injuries and recovery as well.

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4th is a MMQ article on ACL injuries in the NFL.  There have been 50 thus far this year, an all-time high, but only half are due to contact.  Perhaps the above link may be more poignant after reading this and putting your thinking cap on…

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More Mythbusting

Appearing in Patch.com’s RoyalOakPatch, Dr. Neal Alpiner of the Beaumont Children’s Hospital debunked six common myths about adolescent concussions;

Myth No. 1: Most athletes know when they’ve experienced a concussion.
Not so, said Alpiner.

“That ‘wow’ moment is rare,” he said. “It’s really important that teammates, trainers, coaches and parents understand the seriousness of concussions. This includes the symptoms and the need for timely medical treatment. Athletes may not recognize changes in their own behavior and thinking.”

Myth No. 2: Concussions are always a result of high impact.

Myth No. 3: If a young athlete doesn’t lose consciousness, he did not suffer a concussion.

Myth No. 4: Boys are at greater risk than girls for concussions. Continue reading

Great Resource About Concussion Myths

Matt Chaney has been busy this summer with work, but he found some time to forward a bunch of links regarding concussions.  There were a lot dealing with the state laws and the mandates now in place across the sporting landscape, all with very valid opinions.  Some dealt with his area of expertise, steroid and PED detection.  However there was one that I must share with you; a link to a NASP Communique (National Association of School Psychologists)

The link was very resourceful but the gem was the attached .pdf that dealt with the myths we commonly hear with concussions.  Due to the rudeness of ripping off all the information below you will see the myths they took on, and for the actual facts please click on the .pdf link above;

Identifying Concussions

  • Professionals agree on the definition of a concussion.
  • A more accurate term for concussion is a head injury rather than a brain injury. Continue reading