Matt Chaney: Parts 3 & 4

Following up on Part 1 and Part 2 of Matt Chaney, “pseudo-contributor”, looks at both “reform” and “research studies” as they relate to the NFL.  Chaney, although very outspoken on the matter has some very valid points, all worth just thinking about, at the very least.  His sources are some of the best and his writing is exceptional.

In Part 3 titled “Football Brain Trauma Can Twist Personality, Spur Violence“, he takes a look at how changes in mood and overall “being” are being avoided; with such strong words/connotations of “mental disease”, “depression”, “suicide”;

Doctors and medical researchers have long agreed boxing can cause brain damage in athletes and lead to personality disorders and outbursts, through repetitive impacts both concussive and sub-concussive.

A 1973 study on postmortem evidence of 15 ex-pro boxers who suffered “punch-drunk syndrome” documented their “violent behavior and rage reaction” through interviews of relatives. Several of the boxers died in psychiatric wards.

Decades earlier, boxers who became demented and deranged were known as “slug nutty,” according to a 1928 report by Dr. Harrison Martland.

Meanwhile, yet today, the NFL and loyalist experts loathe admitting that tackle football even causes long-term impairment, much less off-field violence by players and chaos for families.

In his latest, Part 4 titled “Research of NFL Brain Trauma Sputters Along“, he takes a look at the research involved, mainly longitudinal Continue reading

Athletic Trainers Needed not Need to be Cut

With the ever-growing current of law suits regarding about everything in life (see hot coffee) when a school district has the chance to diminish some of the risk why not take it.  Sure it is going to cost something up front, but why not be protected and give the coaches and administration some stress relief?  What is the cost for peace of mind?

The website PennLive.com recently ran a story, from the Patriot-Ledger and Stefanie Loh, about how the need for athletic trainers far outweighs the cost associated with the profession (thank you Chainsaw);

“We’ve been working on that for a while now, trying to really emphasize it,” said Janik, the head athletic trainer at King’s College in Wilkes-Barre. “But it’s tough, especially with all the budget cuts.”

With school districts across the state forced to cut corners to accommodate shrinking budgets, there are already indications that some might resort to eliminating athletic training positions to make ends meet.

The state in the story is Pennsylvania, where a recent study found that 81 percent of the high schools had access to an athletic trainer.  However eliminating that position may save some much-needed money, but what about those that are getting hurt, Continue reading