Austin Trenum Follow Up

Last year we were privileged to share with you a mothers note about her son and her great loss.  Austin Trenum never returned to the family on that fateful Sunday in November and Michelle, his mother, reached out to The Concussion Blog to share her thoughts.  After a very long road of recovery that included a new concussion policy for the Prince William County school district, authored by Gil Trenum, and a tough decision to donate his brain to Boston University the wait is over for answers.

The Trenum’s have received the answers that they felt from day one; Continue reading

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Prevention and Education

And it begins at the lowest levels.  If you can educate and make aware of the concussion dangers at a young age then they will have a better chance of retaining the information.  A more important key is that the parents will be aware as their kids get a bit older and the risk of concussions increase they will be prepared.

The Associated Press wrote about how youth football is beginning the process.

USA Football, the sport’s national governing body on the youth and amateur levels, has created a 12-minute video about concussions and made it part of a coaching certification exam. The organization also is pushing the catchphrase “when in doubt, keep them out,” and has just hit TV, radio and the Internet with a campaign called “Put pride aside for player safety,” which aims to erase the notion of someone merely having his bell rung, so he should shake it off and get back in there.

USA Football’s reach is limited, however. It’s a budding group, hoping its work on head injuries will help it gain authority — as opposed to the NFL, NCAA and National Federation of State High School Associations, which already have the power to implement changes.

NFL Player Returns then is Out

The Cleveland Browns had a similar situation, as Stewart Bradley in Philly, this past weekend.  Tight end Evan Moore took a shot from Kansas City Chief Kendrick Lewis and was “rocked”.

According to Tom Withers of the AP

After going down, Moore shook his head as he has done after taking big hits before and jogged to Cleveland’s sideline, where he was met by team trainers. He felt normal and told them so. The 6-foot-6, 250-pounder had taken jarring hits and figured this was just another one.

“It was a good hit,” Moore said, “but I didn’t black out or anything. When I took the hit, Continue reading