LINK: Rebroadcast of Pres. Obama Sports and Concussions

You can follow the link below for the rebroadcast of the “summit” on concussions in sport held at the White House yesterday.

http://www.c-span.org/video/?319639-1/president-obama-sports-concussions

There were some interesting thoughts passed along and it was great to hear the POTUS discuss athletic trainers and the need for them.  The next step in that “finger” of concussion care is to find funding and placement of athletic trainers.

I did enjoy Taylor Twellman’s honesty and direct nature during his time.

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A Preliminary Investigation of Active and Retired NFL Players’ Knowledge of Concussion (2004)

Below is an excerpt from a dissertation from Don Brady, PhD, PsyD, NCSP wrote ten years ago.  Although the year of publishing might seem aged, there are pertinent and salient points to behold in this.  Without further ado…

TBI and Postconcussion:  Many Years of Controversy

Vague and inconsistent definitions of the constructs used to explain a [concussion] brain injury, coupled with confusion and misunderstanding of brain injury symptoms, create further problems in the study of sports-related concussion research.  Wills and Leathem (2001) amplify: “The quagmire created by the use of inconsistent, overlapping and poorly defined terminology relating to brain injury research is exacerbated in sport-related research” (p. 646).

Common synonyms for concussion include mild traumatic brain injury (mild TBI) and minor closed head injury (minor CHI) (Kelly, 1999). Other terms which have been utilized since last century to describe the concept of a mild brain injury include: spinal concussion, railway spine, railway brain, traumatic neurosis, nervous shock, traumatic hysteria, traumatic hysteroneurasthenia, spinal anemia, vasomotor symptom complex, litigation neurosis, compensation neurosis, accident neurosis, Erichsen’s disease, Friedmann’s disease, traumatic neurasthenia, the posttraumatic concussion state, the posttraumatic psychoneurotic state, traumatic encephalopathy, posttraumatic cerebral syndrome, posttraumatic syndrome, post traumatic nervous instability, postconcussion syndrome, postconcussive syndrome, postconcussional syndrome, posttraumatic stress  syndrome, and a persistent postconcussive syndrome (p. 32).

Gerstenbrand and Stepan (2001) also reported a variety of terms being used to describe minor brain injury: “mild head injury, mild injury, traumatic head syndrome, postbrain injury syndrome, mild concussion syndrome, postconcussional syndrome, traumatic cephalgia, posttraumatic syndrome, Commotio cerebri, light traumatic brain injury damage and mild traumatic brain injury” (p. 95).

Approximately 50% of persons who sustained a TBI experienced postconcussion syndrome (PCS), which manifested itself in various symptoms that were not present in the person prior to sustaining the concussion (Bazarian & Atabaki, 2001). Although controversy exists Continue reading

General Dentistry Publishes a Bombshell About Mouth Guards (ADDENDUM)

Is it a bombshell or is it just a plain dud?  I say bombshell, but not in a good way for anyone involved with this “research”.

Last week I was inundated with emails regarding this “new” research about mouth guards and concussions.  There were roughly 16 emails in a one hour time span; some wanting comment, some telling me I have been wrong all along, some promoting the research.  This was a “huge” development in my area and my little corner in the blogosphere.  To fully understand perhaps some history is needed (“mouth gear” search on this blog) when it comes to my feelings on mouth gear and concussions.  Here are some selected comments attributed to me;

The basic fundamentals we should be cognizant of here are: concussion is a BRAIN injury, the BRAIN floats inside skull, Physics dictates that the BRAIN will move depending on the forces applied to the skull/head (not always from a blow to that area), mouth gear cannot stop the BRAIN from moving, mouth gear cannot attenuate any forces to the skull/head that are not in the oral region, mouth gear does nothing for the skull/head when forces are placed on it in rotational, angular, acceleration or deceleration fashion.

Now that we have that all out-of-the-way this is the General Dentistry article I was asked to comment on.  On face value and from a “peer-reviewed” angle it Continue reading