Sylvia Mackey – Video

In a follow-up, and what I believe to be the same presentation that Elanor Profetto’s video is from a very strong and wonderful woman, Sylvia Mackey, “Mrs. 88” gives a talk about brain injury.  She also has intimate and troubling experience with what brain injury/disease can do as she took care of the great John Mackey in is twilight.

Keep on learning and listening!

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Eleanor Perfetto, PhD – Video

Been on a video binge lately…  Look for more, but for today please take a listen to Eleanor Perfetto.  There are some points that some may (including me) not agree with entirely, but she has earned the right to be heard!  Not only is she a pharmaceutical epidemiologist, she is the widow of Ralph Wenzel.

Look for more video tomorrow…

TCB Commenter Highlighted in Canadian Press

If you visit here enough and take the time to look at the comments at the end of the posts you might notice a person named “Phil”.  He especially took time to comment on the work of Terry Ott and his seven-part series about CTE in the CFL.  Thanks to Terry and this blog we are all able to get the genuine views of a former player in the CFL, Phil Colwell, via The Record from Canada and Terry Ott;

Colwell’s brief CFL career ended in 1981 after a violent on-field collision in a game at Winnipeg Stadium. He was playing for the Toronto Argonauts on that crisp and sunny day in October.

Covering a kickoff, Colwell, a solid six-two, 195-pounder with sprinter speed, was blindsided through the ear hole of his helmet by a Winnipeg player and was knocked out cold. He lay motionless on the field while a trainer ran to his assistance. No penalty was called on the play.

This is the type of story that Ott has sent out to tell from the beginning, placing faces and human behind the issue that has become one of the preeminent problems with football.  Yes, this is not isolated to football but we would be remiss if we didn’t expose and tell the stories of the most oft afflicted in the “head games” we now find ourselves knee-deep in;

Colwell, who graduated from Laurier with a psychology degree, found work with a Scottish government agency but continued to suffer bouts of depression and mood swings. He says accompanying anger issues and self-medicating led to moderate bouts of short-term or primary memory loss. Colwell says he frequently “loses the right words.”

The Scottish doctors he consulted were not familiar with professional football Continue reading

Arizona Concussion Conference – NEXT WEEK

AZ Concussion Conf.

I realize this is, kind of, short notice, but space remains for this good-looking concussion conference in Arizona, next week.  However;

The CACTIS Foundation and Banner Concussion Center present recognized thought leaders at the Third Annual Current Topics in Sports Medicine and Concussions 2014: The Essentials Saturday March 22nd in Scottsdale, AZ, at The Scottsdale Plaza Hotel.  The conference will increase awareness of the health risks to athletes, cover the importance of baseline evaluation in athletes, review assessment tools, and discuss best practices for managing patients with concussions.

You can REGISTER HERE.

The list of speakers is very diverse and has a “west coast” vibe to them, here are some of the presenters:

  • Christopher C. Giza, MD – UCLA
  • Stephen M. Erickson, MD – MLB Umpire Medical Services
  • Shelly Massingale, PT – Banner Concussion Center
  • Bridgett Wallace, DPT – Concussion Health
  • Charlie Shearer, OD – Consultant, Colorado Rockies

Continuing Education credits are provided through this learning opportunity, you can see the AGENDA HERE.

#tbt Post: Mild Concussions

Originally Posted January, 2011…

Hogwash!  There is NOTHING mild about a concussion, period.  However media, teams, players and even medical staffs continue to use this nomenclature with this injury.  It is simply counterproductive to label this injury with a “mild” tag, and hampers the effort of everyone trying to increase awareness.

Granted, those that have extensive training in the area of injuries, and particularly head injuries, understand the term “mild” when it is in concert with concussion.  This subset of the population is not the one that needs the education, rather it is the general public, which includes players, coaches and parents.  A common problem amongst people who are educated in a particular field is that they forget about both who they are servicing and the education level of people other than their peers.  It’s a fine balance to educate without talking down to others, but understanding the stigmas of the topics help with that effort.

One serious stigma is the “mild” tag that is placed on concussions.  Those that watch and participate in sports are so used to using that clarification when assessing and addressing injuries as a whole, that perhaps it carries over to the traumatic brain injury just sustained by the athlete.  We as athletic trainers and doctors need to reassess how we describe this particular injury.

During my public speaking I often relate being “mildly” concussed to being “mildly” pregnant…  You are either concussed or not, just like you are pregnant or not.

Some may say that “the symptoms are mild”, or that the  Continue reading

This is Interesting. Share Your Thoughts

I just saw this on Twitter from @NSAFitness, Time to Re-think the Zürich Guidelines? appearing as an editorial in the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine March, 2014 issue.

I can think of many reasons to re-think Zurich; the two biggest is no inclusion of return-to-learn/work and the obvious lack of coalition in concussions.  It may be a “consensus” but really its a compromise, AT BEST.  Here are some excerpts;

The problems with the guidelines include a lack of diagnostic specificity, management strategies that are not evidence based, and rehabilitation goals that are not attainable. Given these problems, the Zürich Guidelines cannot be endorsed.

Don’t know why we have to be more specific, rather more global would make sense: ANY DISRUPTION OF NORMAL BRAIN FUNCTION AFTER AN UNNATURAL TRAUMATIC FORCE IS APPLIED TO THE PATIENT, would fit just fine.  I will defend the non-evidence based management strategies; how can they be evidence based if we are just now getting to this part of the puzzle (SPOILER ALERT: the concussion problem is due to the Continue reading