U of Mich New Video about Education Module


There are many places that provide modules for concussion education.  One of the newest entries in this area is the University of Michigan and Michigan NeuroSport.  Watch this video and once again see an example from a high school athlete.

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “U of Mich New Video about Education Module

  1. A Concerned Mom May 21, 2012 / 12:43

    Kutcher provides some good pointers for prevention at approximately 2 1/2 minutes into the introductory video at the Michigan Neurosport site. Two of his suggestions could potentially help implement limits on full contact contact drills (avoid over-fatigue and more hits = greater likelihood of concussion …. 2 factors which I believe came into play with my son’s concussion – that and of course, even though his helmet was brand new, it wasn’t sized correctly and the air bladder wasn’t checked for proper inflation).

    http://www.uofmhealth.org/neurosport

    It looks like a password is required to view additional instructional videos.

  2. A Concerned Mom May 21, 2012 / 12:51

    I really wish each department of education would focus on providing concussion education to all educators … teachers, principals and other school personnel often don’t seem to have the training they need to properly respond to concussed students. (The link includes a video interview with the concussed student, her mother, and the principal.)

    http://www.kmvt.com/news/local/Eighth-Grader-Suffers-A-Concussion-From-Being-Hit-By-A-Football-152246935.html

    “John Hyatt, O’Leary Middle School Principal says, “we did the best we could with her. She didn’t present anything in terms of, any training that I have about the severity of the situation.””

    “Dayley went back to class, but once she got home, her mom instantly noticed a change in her daughter.

    Robyn Dayley, Pamala’s mother says, “she was just totally a different person than i sent to school that morning and so she told me what had happened. I told her we’re going to the hospital, but she was talking about nonsense, things that had happened, mashing them together.””

    “The news about going to the ER didn’t sit well with Pamala.
    Pamala missed 22 days of school, all from being hit by a football.”

    “”I was blown away when her mom called me and told me how severe it was, what the limitations were…All of my training failed me at this time,” adds Hyatt.

    For Pamala, she still suffers from headaches and memory lapses, but taking her mother’s advice was the best thing that happened on that fateful day.

    Principal Hyatt tells us he needs more training for concussions, despite having taken several first aid courses and training when he was a coach.”

  3. A Concerned Mom May 22, 2012 / 11:54

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/47513684

    “Bullis School senior Carley Sturges, 18, is fierce on the lacrosse field and loves the sport. Last year during a tournament, she took a hit to the head with a lacrosse stick.

    “I was going for a ground ball. One girl knocked my goggles off and the other slashed me across the temple. I remember falling. I didn’t black out. I kept playing, so I knew when I got home something was wrong. I didn’t feel right,” she told 11 News I-Team reporter Lisa Robinson. “I was really tired and my head was pounding.”

    Sturges ended up with a concussion that took her out of her Potomac high school and out of the game for two and a half months. Her mother, Wendy Sturges, said she remembers her daughter having a rough time.

    “She did a lot of sleeping and mumbling and not even being able to carry on a conversation,” she said.”

  4. A Concerned Mom May 22, 2012 / 21:02

    http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2012/05/22/growing-concern-over-concussions-among-youth-athletes/#respond

    ““I got hit really hard, helmet to helmet,” said 12-year-old Nico Vittori of Naperville.

    He suffered his second concussion, following a head shot playing football last fall, and his mother Nina has watched his long, difficult road to recovery.

    “We kept him out the rest of the season, but the headaches never stopped. The foggy brain went away, but it was causing trouble with him at school,” said Nina Vittori.”

    “When Johnson’s then 6-year-old son, Jaden, suffered a concussion after getting hit in a hockey game, the Chicago Hawks Hockey Club said it would take no action.

    The Johnsons were referred to the state hockey board, Amateur Hockey Association Illinois (AHAI).

    “We conducted our own investigation,” said board member Kevin Bolger.

    Bolger instructed the club to better educate coaches, parents, and players; and he told the club that it and the player would be monitored until the end of the year.”

  5. Robert L. Washick, Ed.D.: LD April 19, 2014 / 05:22

    I recently read that Dr. Kutcher stated there is no – single confirmatory diagnostic test for concussion. I screen in approximately ten minutes and read what I “see” to the parent/guardian/client during the process. In one specific case a former major, and a current columnist for a newspaper, riding a bicycle and damaged in a car accident. He was hospitalized and sent home. The wife asked if anyone could “walk” with him .. .I told her I had a program … I screened him, and no doubt he had brain damage, and could only recall a few letters of the alphabet. He was, of course, hyperkinetic, could get up and walk away, feel frustrated, annoyed, unpredictable. I informed the wife I would work with him in the house, and when I felt he got control, I wanted him in a library. The process took 12 hours in his case (an hour a day). A member of the newspaper was talking to me about him … because they were informed it would take years of rehab for any improvement … yet, he was back at work and writing columns and still does. The paper did an article interviewing three others I worked with … with different backgrounds and varied ages 7, 23, 78… all successful. In fact the 78 year old who had Alzheimer effects, was so excited because for the first time in his life … he could print words and circle by pencil/pen cars he was interested in in the paper. My personal opinion of this man he did have effects of Alzheimer, but I believe he was a dyslexic: He could read an article fluently, but when asked what he read would state something absolutely different … his wife there — I stated and you were called to the principals office often … and she nodded and stated, he was there often.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s