Tom McHale and CTE


There is an amazing “Outside the Lines” video on the ESPN.com website.  There is an issue of embedding it here on this site, however I can provide a link (7 minutes).

OTL: Future of Football

The story begins telling us about Tom McHale, former NFL offensive lineman, who had a terrible end to his life at a young age.  What was found posthumously in Tom’s brain was chronic traumatic encephalopathy, an occurrence that is becoming more evident as brains are examined.  Although CTE cannot be directly contributed to his death, CTE can cloud judgment and affect the executive function of the brain, leading to cases like McHale.

The video takes a look at what former players think of the sport, in particular what they are going to do with their own kids; the McHale’s, Eddie Mason and LaVar Arrington.

Take a look and comment back here.

2 thoughts on “Tom McHale and CTE

  1. brokenbrilliant February 6, 2011 / 10:50

    Great video – shows different sides of the issue in what I think is a pretty balanced way. No one argument seems to take precedence over the others. Although the arguments against playing tackle football at a young age are pretty convincing.

    It does leave me wondering, however, to what extent our world has been shaped by the effects of concussions in young kids. This problem isn’t new — how has it affected our world and our lives to this point?

  2. Ross February 7, 2011 / 10:21

    I was wondering if you had seen this. It would have fit perfectly in with the clinic the other night.

    I think if nothing else it makes us pause and consider the possible repercussions long-term. I know that I have gone through the process (and still do) of considering my decisons/behavior, etc. past and present. My wife is aware of this as well and educating family/friends is now very much important to me. I want to know if I display behaviors and I definitely want to be cognizant of other people who may be in the same situation.

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