Tag Archives: CDC

Hit Count® Has Come To Fruition

27 Jan

Prevention of concussion is a bit of an oxymoron; nothing we know about concussions can stop them from occurring while in action.  HOWEVER, there is one way to prevent concussions – limiting exposure to the collisions that create a concussion.  Moreover, research suggests – as well as observations – that being exposed to subconcussive hits can have detrimental effects on brain function.  The subconcussive hits may even predispose someone to getting a concussion later on; this is obvious if you look at the data we have collected on NFL concussion over the past four years, (305 concussions in weeks 1-9 vs. 377 concussions in weeks 10-17) greater than a 20% increase as the season wears on.

Sports Legacy Institute has announced a certification program to further the Hit Count® initiative during a press release during Super Bowl week in New York City, today (along with the SLI Hit Count White Paper – see link below press release);

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Sports Legacy Institute Launches Hit Count® Certification Program in Collaboration with Leading Concussion Experts and Head Sensor Device Companies to Make Contact Sports Safer

Using Hit Count® Certified Products to Monitor and Minimize Brain Trauma Could Eliminate 500 Million Head Impacts in Football a Year, with the Goal of Reducing Risk of Concussion and Long-Term Brain Damage

New York City – January 27, 2014 – The non-profit Sports Legacy Institute (SLI) announced a major advance in the effort to prevent concussions and brain damage in contact sports today with the launch of the Hit Count® certification program after two years of development, which was unveiled at a press conference at the 2014 Super Bowl Media Center in New York City.

Hit Count® builds on the progress that head sensor device companies have made in developing devices that can measure acceleration of the head. Current products used on the field are focused on  alerting coaches, medical professionals, and parents when a potential concussive impact occurs.

Inspired by Pitch Counts baseball, which set limits to the number of times a player throws from the  mound to prevent arm injury, Hit Count® Certified Devices will have a second function that measures and “Counts” impacts that exceed the Hit Count® Threshold, set by a committee of  leading scientists, with the goal of minimizing brain injury.

“Research using sensor devices has revealed that each year in the United States, there are over 1.5 billion impacts to the heads of youth and high school football players,” said Chris Nowinski, Founding Executive Director of SLI who launched the Hit Count® initiative in 2012 with SLI Medical Director Dr. Robert Cantu. “Most hits are unnecessary and occur in practice. By utilizing  Hit Count® certified products as a teaching tool for coaches and a behavior modification tool for athletes, we can eliminate over 500 million head impacts next season.”

Committee member Gerry Gioia, PhD, of Children’s National Medical Center and Continue reading

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Schutt Puts Technology to Work on Helmet Label

25 Jul

Schutt Helmets out of Litchfield, Illinois has taken the warning label to new levels.  You know, those tags that seem to be in the way when we buy something new – often discarded as quickly as possible;

The new Schutt warning label will feature a permanent, interactive graphic called a QR Code, which can be scanned by any mobile device. Scanning the new Schutt warning label will launch CDC’s new “Heads Up” concussion app, making it very easy for millions of football players, fans, coaches and parents to get the information they’re looking for.

“There is no organization in the country that is more highly recognized for their unbiased and objective work on concussions than CDC,” said Robert Erb, CEO of Schutt Sports. “By using this QR Code on our warning label, we’ll make the very best information from the very best source available immediately – and permanently – on our helmets. We briefly thought about just using a simple hangtag, but we know very few actually get read. Most are thrown away. We wanted to do something more useful than that and really produce something positive in the marketplace.”

Players, coaches and parents can read the new warning label – which has the same text as before – but can now also scan the QR Code, which will launch the “Heads Up” app on their mobile device or make it easy for the user to download the app.

I do applaud the effort to educate in the easiest possible way, as well as use of the CDC.  When people start to take the time to truly understand about concussions (and all the equipment involved in any sport) we will begin to see a paradigm shift.

You can view the images below and read the full press release;  Continue reading

CDC, NIOSH and Department of HHS Issue Statement

27 Jan

For many years the “government” has kept its collective mouth shut about happenings in sports.  Occasionally they will make statements regarding the health of players in sports; case in point steroids and PED’s.  The highest football league in the States and world has often had little resistance from “government” while doing business, until now.

The Department of Health and Human Services along with The Center for Disease Control and The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health have released an NFL Notification about brain and nervous system disorders.  The NFL Notification can be found by clicking on the jump above.  Here are the highlights;

  • In general, brain and nervous system disorders were more than 3 times higher among players; 17 players died with Alzheimer’s, ALS, or Parkinson’s compared to 5 men in the U.S. (see graph).
  • More speed position players died from these disorders compared to the non-speed position players.
  • ALS was 4 times higher among players; 7 players died with ALS compared to fewer than 2 men in the U.S.
  • Alzheimer’s was 4 times higher among players; 7 players died with Alzheimer’s compared to fewer than 2 men in the U.S.
  • Parkinson’s was not increased among players compared to men in the U.S.

This is not “old” news rather, it is confirming what has already been known, but Continue reading

Finally Addressing Adcademic Concerns of Concussions

3 Aug

This one is a very good seminar for anyone who deals with school aged children and once again it is free.  This event will be put on by the CDC and the most poignant part is the academic and return to school concerns when dealing with the brain injury known as concussion.  It has been my opinion that not only have the parents and schools underplayed the seriousness of returning to school with a brain injury, the medical community has been behind as well.  Brain health will need to be though of as physical health going forward.  Not only is stressing the cognitive parts of the brain while injured a problem, the most overlooked portion of school is something Don Brady has been the champion of, the emotional wellness of the brain/individual.

Get yourself registered, set a reminder on your phone (just tell Siri) and take notes; parents especially.

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CDC Heads Up to Schools Webinar for Schools Professionals

Tuesday, August 7, 2012 at 2:00 – 3:00 PM EST.

Click below to register for a FREE CDC webinar on concussion in schools (K-12): https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3354303556335213312

This webinar will help you:  

  • Learn the signs, symptoms and effects of a concussion on students K-12.
  • Know how to prevent and respond to concussions in school.
  • Explore school-wide approaches to addressing concussion.
  • Learn ways to support individual students returning to school after a concussion.

Invited presenters include:

 

Julie Haarbauer-Krupa, Ph.D.

B.R.A.I.N. Program Coordinator

Children’s Health Care of Atlanta

 

Karen McAvoy, Psy.D

Director of the R.E.A.P Program

Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children

 

CDC is dedicated to improving the lives of Americans and keeping them safe from injury. Through the Heads Up program, CDC provides information on preventing, recognizing, and responding to concussion, and more serious brain injuries.

For more information, visit www.cdc.gov/Concussion.

Message from the CDC

29 Feb

The Centers for Disease Control have reached out to us at The Concussion Blog.  They are interested in publishing information via our blog, which I am both honored and flattered to be considered.  I am getting nothing in return, although I would love to be on their panel of concussion experts that help form plans, what the CDC gets is another avenue to disseminate information (no Irv and Matt I am not selling out).

I am more than happy to help out, but remember that this is information for everyone to take on their own, TCB does not always endorse all material from third-parties.  However giving the reader more information to digest is EXACTLY what we set out to do from the beginning of this blog.

Without further ado here is the recent CDC message; Continue reading

Political Football: Irv Muchnick

14 Oct

Irvin Muchnick is a writer and investigative journalist who previously mainly focused on the WWE.  Muchnick has changed gears a bit and started Concussion Inc, a website focusing on the head injury issue.

On Friday, on Beyond Chron, Irv Muchnick wrote about the appearance of a conflict of interest between the Centers for Disease Control and the National Football League, in regards to the upcoming panel and recommendations.  In the article Irv was right to point out that the federally funded CDC is taking outside monies for the first time;

A CDC spokeswoman admitted to me that the NFL’s $150,000 grant for “Heads Up” marked “the first time the CDC Foundation has received external funding to help support” this initiative, which has a decade-long history encompassing various outreach to health care professionals and patients, school professionals, sports coaches, parents, and kids and teens. (CDC’s own funding for this program has averaged around $200,000 a year.)

Which brings into question who will be in control of the recommendations?  Will the people shaping the foundation of concussion management, aimed at athletic trainers and doctors, actually have representatives in place?  I am not talking about the usual suspects that may hold a MD or ATC tag – the ones who do Yoeman’s work in the research field – rather some of the “boots on the ground” if you will.  Yes there are some Continue reading

CDC New Estimates; What It May Mean

6 Oct

The CDC released a report about TBI’s (including concussions) being seen in emergency departments.  The report shows a 62% increase over the years of 2001-2009;

This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicated that an estimated 173,285 persons aged ≤19 years were treated in EDs annually for nonfatal TBIs related to sports and recreation activities. From 2001 to 2009, the number of annual TBI-related ED visits increased significantly, from 153,375 to 248,418, with the highest rates among males aged 10–19 years. By increasing awareness of TBI risks from sports and recreation, employing proper technique and protective equipment, and quickly responding to injuries, the incidence, severity, and long-term negative health effects of TBIs among children and adolescents can be reduced

These injuries were surveyed from 39 different but related activities that were classified as organized or unorganized sports.  The article theorizes that the increase can be due to Continue reading

NOCSAE & CDC

21 Jul

NOCSAE is teaming up with the CDC to make an effort to get the parents educated in the area of concussions.  The CDC has made a great effort with the coaches and health care providers by producing material specific to those areas.  Although there has been some material for parents this effort will be focused on the moms and dads;

The National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are teaming up to launch “Heads Up to Parents,” a new educational initiative designed specifically to provide parents with the facts about how to protect, prevent and respond to youth and high school athlete concussions. The partnership, made possible by a grant from NOCSAE to the CDC Foundation, builds on the CDC’s successful “Heads Up” initiative featuring free tools for coaches, athletes, parents and healthcare professionals that provide important information on preventing, recognizing and responding to a concussion.

If there is not an athletic trainer or doctor Continue reading

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