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Sylvia Mackey – Video

27 Mar

In a follow-up, and what I believe to be the same presentation that Elanor Profetto’s video is from a very strong and wonderful woman, Sylvia Mackey, “Mrs. 88″ gives a talk about brain injury.  She also has intimate and troubling experience with what brain injury/disease can do as she took care of the great John Mackey in is twilight.

Keep on learning and listening!

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A Decent Video

24 Mar

I am finding it hard to find time to post, obviously, but I will get back to this as soon as I can.  For the time being here is a decent video I have had forwarded to me that can be a good example of concussion or mTBI…

I would love to see discussion on this, below!

TCB Commenter Highlighted in Canadian Press

18 Mar

If you visit here enough and take the time to look at the comments at the end of the posts you might notice a person named “Phil”.  He especially took time to comment on the work of Terry Ott and his seven-part series about CTE in the CFL.  Thanks to Terry and this blog we are all able to get the genuine views of a former player in the CFL, Phil Colwell, via The Record from Canada and Terry Ott;

Colwell’s brief CFL career ended in 1981 after a violent on-field collision in a game at Winnipeg Stadium. He was playing for the Toronto Argonauts on that crisp and sunny day in October.

Covering a kickoff, Colwell, a solid six-two, 195-pounder with sprinter speed, was blindsided through the ear hole of his helmet by a Winnipeg player and was knocked out cold. He lay motionless on the field while a trainer ran to his assistance. No penalty was called on the play.

This is the type of story that Ott has sent out to tell from the beginning, placing faces and human behind the issue that has become one of the preeminent problems with football.  Yes, this is not isolated to football but we would be remiss if we didn’t expose and tell the stories of the most oft afflicted in the “head games” we now find ourselves knee-deep in;

Colwell, who graduated from Laurier with a psychology degree, found work with a Scottish government agency but continued to suffer bouts of depression and mood swings. He says accompanying anger issues and self-medicating led to moderate bouts of short-term or primary memory loss. Colwell says he frequently “loses the right words.”

The Scottish doctors he consulted were not familiar with professional football Continue reading

Arizona Concussion Conference – NEXT WEEK

14 Mar

AZ Concussion Conf.

I realize this is, kind of, short notice, but space remains for this good-looking concussion conference in Arizona, next week.  However;

The CACTIS Foundation and Banner Concussion Center present recognized thought leaders at the Third Annual Current Topics in Sports Medicine and Concussions 2014: The Essentials Saturday March 22nd in Scottsdale, AZ, at The Scottsdale Plaza Hotel.  The conference will increase awareness of the health risks to athletes, cover the importance of baseline evaluation in athletes, review assessment tools, and discuss best practices for managing patients with concussions.

You can REGISTER HERE.

The list of speakers is very diverse and has a “west coast” vibe to them, here are some of the presenters:

  • Christopher C. Giza, MD – UCLA
  • Stephen M. Erickson, MD – MLB Umpire Medical Services
  • Shelly Massingale, PT – Banner Concussion Center
  • Bridgett Wallace, DPT – Concussion Health
  • Charlie Shearer, OD – Consultant, Colorado Rockies

Continuing Education credits are provided through this learning opportunity, you can see the AGENDA HERE.

#tbt Post: Mild Concussions

13 Mar

Originally Posted January, 2011…

Hogwash!  There is NOTHING mild about a concussion, period.  However media, teams, players and even medical staffs continue to use this nomenclature with this injury.  It is simply counterproductive to label this injury with a “mild” tag, and hampers the effort of everyone trying to increase awareness.

Granted, those that have extensive training in the area of injuries, and particularly head injuries, understand the term “mild” when it is in concert with concussion.  This subset of the population is not the one that needs the education, rather it is the general public, which includes players, coaches and parents.  A common problem amongst people who are educated in a particular field is that they forget about both who they are servicing and the education level of people other than their peers.  It’s a fine balance to educate without talking down to others, but understanding the stigmas of the topics help with that effort.

One serious stigma is the “mild” tag that is placed on concussions.  Those that watch and participate in sports are so used to using that clarification when assessing and addressing injuries as a whole, that perhaps it carries over to the traumatic brain injury just sustained by the athlete.  We as athletic trainers and doctors need to reassess how we describe this particular injury.

During my public speaking I often relate being “mildly” concussed to being “mildly” pregnant…  You are either concussed or not, just like you are pregnant or not.

Some may say that “the symptoms are mild”, or that the  Continue reading

4th Annual Traumatic Brain Injury Conference

25 Feb

April 16 and 17 in Washington DC – make your plans now!  Visit Site HERE.

Now in its 4th year, Arrowhead’s Annual TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY CONFERENCE  brings together researchers and clinicians from industry, academia, the military and government to present ground-breaking research in a variety of areas related to traumatic brain injury, including:

  • Neuroimaging
  • Clinical Trial Design
  • Cognitive Measures of TBI
  • Chronic Outcomes
  • Drug Discovery & Development
  • Pre-clinical Models
  • Biomarkers
  • Neurodegenerative Implications for TBI

This is shaping up to be one of the good conference in regards to traumatic brain injury.  The focus will not be on concussions rather the global injury of the brain.  The information shared here will help with the concussion issue going forward.  If you get the chance and have the resources this is a place that you should go.

REGISTER HERE

Repost: Matt Chaney’s Take on Heads Up Football

21 Feb

The following was posted here on TCB 10/24/13, I feel with the traffic it has been garnering that it should be reposted at the top of the cue for the time being.  It is worth comment and questions…

The post below is from Matt Chaney’s Blog, re-posted (in part) here with his permission.  We are posting it here not as an endorsement, rather as an opposing view that is worth the read.  Our commentary on this article by Chaney will be below this post.  We encourage everyone to see the entire post on his blog.  You can view it by clicking on the hotlink, it is titled; ‘Heads Up Football’: Truth, Tales and Legal Consequences.  *Chaney has moved his blog and we are efforting the current link of his original article.  However, he does read the comments from time to time so if you have question leave it here and he may get to it.

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By Matt Chaney

Posted Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Peter King posits bogus hitting technique as Safer Football in Sports Illustrated

—geezuz, the further we go in this latest football crisis, the worse many people become, willingly, on behalf of the sexy blood sport… and so Peter King of SI skips along, telling us bona fide prevention is possible for football’s irreversible head-ramming… a new post by the Hall of Fame football scribe portrays Heads Up ‘proper contact’ as legitimate; King purports this theoretical headless hitting can be instilled by coaches, enforced by referees, adopted by players… I’d like to see King demonstrate on a football field, suited-up himself for forward collisions governed by physics and bullet-head helmets; he’d ram, too, or get his ass kicked… look, folks, players cannot govern or stop ramming on a football field; rather, forces of the crazy game dictate human behavior… forget talk and trust your eyesight, especially naïve parents and kids, to understand Heads Up ‘technique’ is invalid, unreliable, a lienothing new: it’s mere rehash of musty old ‘head up’ form hitting, proven invalid since the 1960s… here’s King, introducing his discussion:

What’s been eye-opening to discover is the trickle-down effect from the NFL to youth football. As the pro league emphasizes safety more and more, so do high schools around America. … Coaches are concerned; 41 of 49 polled [by SI] said they have modified training techniques because of increased education about concussions and head trauma.

—sure, trickle-down effect will reform football danger, once again… solution for brain trauma in the collision game is just around the corner… like trickle-down ‘steroid awareness’ for football’s immense problem with anabolic substances…  King continues:

Several high school coaches emphasized the NFL teaching new tackling techniques, such as “Heads Up Football,” which teaches coaches to train kids to tackle with heads up—instead of using the helmet as a battering ram. Said Middlebury Union (Vt.) coach Dennis Smith: “In any drills we’re doing—whether it be fundamental drills at the beginning of practices, especially defensive practices—we’re always stressing head up. You have to be able to see what you’re tackling.” … Said Brandon (Miss.) coach Brad Peterson: “We always start the year, whether spring or fall, with walking through the proper techniques of tackling.” … The coach of E.O. Smith High in Storrs, Conn., Jody Minotti, said he knows he can’t prevent every concussion, but he trains his players to minimize the risks. “We do less contact throughout the week and we teach proper tackling,” said Minotti. “We preach in practice all of the time, ‘Bite the ball. Bite the ball.’ That means keep your head up and don’t ever lead with your helmet. We film tackling, we talk about tackling whenever we’re watching film.”

—huh, these coaches don’t address the facemask dilemma, the prime fault of football rules behind the charade of Continue reading

Research That Should Stop You In Your Tracks

6 Feb

OK, that title may be hyperbole, but the new research out of Canada should make you take a step back and realize what our fine researchers are now able to discover.  Considering the context of hockey it shouldn’t be shocking that this was found in Canada (since posting we have been informed that work was done on both sides of the border), but really for a long while now some of the best work on concussions is coming from the North, for whatever reason (no disrespect to the US scientists).

Now that I effectively pissed off a few readers with the last comment, here is what was found by Dr. Paul Echlin and team:

  • concussions alter the white matter of the brain
  • structural damage can now be seen
  • MRI was used
  • this is both males and females
  • brain vascular changes were noted in males only, but resolved at two months
  • comparison with control counterparts showed that concussed individuals had white mater changes at end of season (upon being fully resolved from injury)

From the CTV News article (video at jump);  Continue reading

My Personal Thoughts and Opinions of #C4CT

29 Jan

IMG_1656I am toying with posting some “behind the scenes” stuff, I will start here and see what kind of response I get…  So, here we go and enjoy!

  •  Jack Brewer, Gerald Commissiong and General Peter Chiarelli have a vision of “shared information and working together” to solve this issue.  This means not only research but interventions and management.  I really can grasp onto this. Continue reading

Field Report From TCB Commentator

28 Jan

New York City – January 28, 2014 – Yesterday, TCB posted the announcement by the non-profit Sports Legacy Institute (SLI) regarding the launch of the Hit Count® certification program after two years of development.  Occasional guest poster Dorothy Bedford attended the press conference and filed this report from the Super Bowl Media Center at the New York Sheraton.

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The announcement was attended by several dozen members of the print and broadcast press corps, and other interested parties. In addition to the featured speakers, representatives of several Hit Count sensor device companies were on hand, including g-Force Tracker of Toronto; ImpaKt Protective (Shockbox) of Ottawa; and MC 10 (Checklight by Reebok). Commentary from Dr. Gerald Gioia, Dr. Blaine Hoshizaki, Chris Nowinski and former NFLers Mikes Haynes and Ted Johnson was supplemented by observations from Riverdale Country School (NYC) Athletic Director John Pizzi (RCS was a beta test site for one sensor) about the sensors’ real-time on-the-field utility, from parent Andrea Lustig, mother of a concussion victim, and from Paul Walker, a co-founder of g-Force Tracker.  Presented in the context of football’s marquee event, the new sensors will nevertheless also provide equally good information for other contact sports including boys and girls soccer, boys and girls lacrosse, boys and girls ice hockey, and others (involving headgear or not), as revealed in the Q&A. The Q&A was extensive, so the session unexpectedly ran 90 minutes.

Although rising injury statistics underscore increased awareness, Nowinski pointed out that most concussions are actually still not diagnosed for youth and high school football players. By using Hit Count ® as a teaching tool, efforts to educate coaches and modify players’ behavior can be focused where they can do the most good. “The sensoring technology is critical,” said Nowinski, “finally, the hits can be accurately counted and forces measured. We can achieve apples-to-apples comparison.” Nowinski also thanked the six founding Hit Count ® sponsors for stepping up to the technical challenges presented by the concept of sensoring hits.

Dr. Blaine Hoshizaki, director of the Neurotrauma Lab at the University of Ottawa, explained some of the technical details behind the certification criteria, which include nine different types of impacts. The criteria were set to include as many linear accelerations of the head that may cause brain injury as possible. He also noted that the threshold criteria for rotational impact are not yet part of the Hit Count ® certification, but are still being studied. [Only a few of the new sensors can measure and record rotational forces, whose shearing action on brain tissue has been discussed in the scientific literature.]

Dr Gerald Gioia of Children’s National Medical Center and George Washington University School of Medicine elaborated further. For instance, why was 20 g’s (linear force) set as the threshold for a subconcussive blows?  Gioia demonstrated some of the many lesser forces, such as a thump on the back (4g’s), which are very unlikely to cause damage.  While most sensors will Continue reading

Hit Count® Has Come To Fruition

27 Jan

Prevention of concussion is a bit of an oxymoron; nothing we know about concussions can stop them from occurring while in action.  HOWEVER, there is one way to prevent concussions – limiting exposure to the collisions that create a concussion.  Moreover, research suggests – as well as observations – that being exposed to subconcussive hits can have detrimental effects on brain function.  The subconcussive hits may even predispose someone to getting a concussion later on; this is obvious if you look at the data we have collected on NFL concussion over the past four years, (305 concussions in weeks 1-9 vs. 377 concussions in weeks 10-17) greater than a 20% increase as the season wears on.

Sports Legacy Institute has announced a certification program to further the Hit Count® initiative during a press release during Super Bowl week in New York City, today (along with the SLI Hit Count White Paper – see link below press release);

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Sports Legacy Institute Launches Hit Count® Certification Program in Collaboration with Leading Concussion Experts and Head Sensor Device Companies to Make Contact Sports Safer

Using Hit Count® Certified Products to Monitor and Minimize Brain Trauma Could Eliminate 500 Million Head Impacts in Football a Year, with the Goal of Reducing Risk of Concussion and Long-Term Brain Damage

New York City – January 27, 2014 – The non-profit Sports Legacy Institute (SLI) announced a major advance in the effort to prevent concussions and brain damage in contact sports today with the launch of the Hit Count® certification program after two years of development, which was unveiled at a press conference at the 2014 Super Bowl Media Center in New York City.

Hit Count® builds on the progress that head sensor device companies have made in developing devices that can measure acceleration of the head. Current products used on the field are focused on  alerting coaches, medical professionals, and parents when a potential concussive impact occurs.

Inspired by Pitch Counts baseball, which set limits to the number of times a player throws from the  mound to prevent arm injury, Hit Count® Certified Devices will have a second function that measures and “Counts” impacts that exceed the Hit Count® Threshold, set by a committee of  leading scientists, with the goal of minimizing brain injury.

“Research using sensor devices has revealed that each year in the United States, there are over 1.5 billion impacts to the heads of youth and high school football players,” said Chris Nowinski, Founding Executive Director of SLI who launched the Hit Count® initiative in 2012 with SLI Medical Director Dr. Robert Cantu. “Most hits are unnecessary and occur in practice. By utilizing  Hit Count® certified products as a teaching tool for coaches and a behavior modification tool for athletes, we can eliminate over 500 million head impacts next season.”

Committee member Gerry Gioia, PhD, of Children’s National Medical Center and Continue reading

Video Interlude

27 Jan

I occasionally look for videos for education purposes.  Today, I found a really good one, except for the “minor concussion” note early on…

More to come today…

NOCSAE Advancing Testing?

27 Jan

Perhaps, pending a vote in June, new standards could be set to get a helmet NOCSAE certified.  The news comes as the research arm has come up with plans for a testing scenario for something beyond linear drops;

The National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) board of directors has approved the development of a revised football helmet standard that will require helmets to limit certain concussion causing forces.

You can see the full NOCSAE Jan 24 Release by clicking on the link.

It has been a long while since the standards have changed, but the calls for including more “realistic” type of scenarios in place have been loud for some time.  Including your’s truly, who believe that the rotational and angular forces were woefully under represented in any sort of testing.  I have been told by one representative with vested interest in this that for years the issue has been that these type of tests were “not repeatable.”

If everyone can be on the same footing with this and these new ideas actually translate to the “real world” then I am all for it, no matter the cost.  However, if this is something that is pure window dressing and will not actually impact a change – if that is even possible – then we are wasting time and money.

#C4CT Concussion Summit Agenda Set

22 Jan

Brewer Sports International has set their agenda for the 2014 Concussion Summit in New York at the United Nations on January 29th.  You can view the full .pdf HERE.

Time is running short for your attendance but I can tell you that this meeting will be well worth the time and investment.  You can also catch some of the Super Bowl festivities during your time in The City (this guy will be).

I am excited to be on a speaking panel, but I am also excited to be typing away a live blog during the event.  I hope that my keystrokes don’t bother those in attendance too much!  Although I will be updating it live, I promise that I will not get every little nugget interesting to you, but I will capture the best I can.

You can register HERE.

As you might imagine there have been plenty of meetings presented to me while I will be there, but I am trying to figure out a spot where we can possibly have a meet up and discuss – stuff.

However, there is one meeting that I have yet to be invited to, but would gladly accept; a meeting with Mr. Goodell and the NFL.  This may be pleading here, but if anyone can make it happen I am open in the afternoon of the 28th!  Hahaha!

University of Oregon Novel Study

22 Jan

I found a very interesting email about research being done at the University of Oregon.  It was so well written I thought I would just place it on the blog…

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In what may be the first study of its kind, the University of Oregon’s Motion Analysis Laboratory released a fascinating and chilling new video that illustrates the dramatic effect a concussion can have on high school athletes’ ability to control balance while walking.

Using computer generated images from reflective markers worn by the subjects, the video shows the gaits of two high school students – one a healthy subject and the other a victim of a concussion from a helmet-to-helmet collision in football practice two days prior – to emphasize the poor control and balance of the concussed athlete.

The full study included 40 high school athletes – 20 who were diagnosed with a concussion from sports including football, soccer, volleyball and wrestling, and 20 similar healthy athletes – who were tested over a two-month period. The results showed that the concussed athletes had trouble maintaining balance and walking speed while also responding to auditory cues as long as two months following the concussion.

Research on concussion recovery time, like what is being done at the University of Oregon, may help improve safety and better pinpoint when it is safe for to return to field or court.

Return To Learn Conference

16 Jan

TINY FINALTime is running short for this conference as well, but I thought I would provide another opportunity for people to gain valuable information in the dynamic concussion issue.  A friend of the blog, Katherine Snedaker, is putting on a novel conference; based around the return to learn aspect of concussions.

NORWALK, JAN. 12, 2013 – Katherine Snedaker, MSW and Founder of Pink Concussions, an international social media organization focused on research and resources for female concussions from sports, accidents or military service, and SportsCAPP, a Concussion Education, Advocacy and Policy Group, has announced the dates for The Concussion Conference: Connecticut: Return to School THEN Return to Learn.

The Conference will take place on Thursday January 30th, 2014 at Chelsea Piers Connecticut in Stamford, and then repeat with the same format on Friday, January 31, 2014, at Quinnipiac  University School of Medicine in North Haven, CT.

To register, see http://www.TheConcussionConference.com and to follow on Twitter use #CTBrain.

The Concussion Conference will provide training sessions for school nurses, school staff, pediatricians, athletic trainers, and parents on how best to help children return to school and continue  to heal after concussions.

The Conference daytime training sessions will feature multiple national speakers including Brenda Eagan Brown who is co-author the new 2013 CDC Resource: Helping Students Recover from a Concussion: Classroom Tips for Teachers. Also presenting is Dr. Mike Lee, co-author of the newly issued American Academy of Pediatrics’ report, Returning to Learning Following a Concussion.

You can find the remainder of the Full Press Release HERE.

This event will be on the heels of the Brewer Sports International #C4CT Concussion Summit in NYC.  I wanted to be there as a presenter and as a friend, alas my duty as an athletic trainer will not allow me to do so.  I encourage people and press who have the time to make the Connecticut events as this is a new angle that Katherine is attempting.

In addition to Brenda Eagan Brown, attendees can listen to addresses from Alan Goldberger and TJ Quinn among others, you can find the speaker list HERE.

You can register for the conference HERE.

 

The OTL Investigation on ‘Heads Up’ Football

14 Jan

It may have slipped some of your reading or viewing, but ESPN’s Outside the Lines did a piece on the USA Football Heads Up Program.  The article and video were presented last Sunday morning – I cannot find a YouTube version of the OTL show but you can find that part HERE.  The seven minute presentation is great for a quick overview of the issues ESPN has found.

For more in-depth coverage you should read the article by Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada, the same authors that penned League of Denial.  There are some wonderful points brought to light by the Fainaru’s;

The program teaches concussion awareness and proper helmet fitting, but its central tenet is the soon-to-be trademarked Heads Up Tackling program. When executed properly, proponents say, Heads Up Tackling literally takes the head out of the game. Players are taught to keep their heads up and lead with their shoulders when tackling.

[...]

But critics view Heads Up as a cynical marketing ploy — a repackaging of old terminology to reassure parents at a time the sport is confronting a widening health crisis.

There is a reason I have been “relatively” quiet on this topic; it’s because they are doing some very good things in the way of education and helmet fitting.  As you may know I am huge on the topic of awareness when it comes to concussions.  I have stated many times that the injury itself is not the “ice burg we can see above the water” rather it’s the mismanagement of the concussion that is the massive ice chunk we cannot see from the surface.

That being said, with the actual tackling technique being taught I too feel this is a repackaging of an old mantra.  Rules were even put in place as early as the 70′s to accomplish this task of taking the head out of the game.  Face tackling, spearing and butt blocking all have been on the books as penalties to help avoid using the head as a weapon.

The problem being that those are not called very often, when they are called they are inconsistent at best, and what has it done for the game over nearly 40 years?  I am not nearly as critical as others;  Continue reading

#C4CT Concussion Summit 2014

7 Jan

In a little over three weeks, Brewer Sports International (BSI) along with #C4CT (Coalition for Concussion Treatment) founding partner Amarantus BioScience will be hosting their 2nd Concussion Summit in New York, at the United Nations.  There have been many press releases on this event, and I have mentioned it a time or two on Twitter (and will continue).

Sure, there are many “summits” around concussions and head trauma – which is great as it keeps the dialog going – but few are populated by people with ideas on going forward.  Often, we find ourselves sitting, listening to bright people talk about what was done and can’t be done; rarely do we find the same bright people addressing the issues going forward.  Whether that be with tactical changes or with management or even the possibility of intervention with traumatic brain injury.

This edition of the #C4CT Summit on January 29, 2014 will hear from some people in many fields – you can see the current line-up HERE – focusing on the burgeoning topics of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), general neuroscience, pharmacology among other topics.

Interestingly enough, yours truly, was invited to sit on a panel and discuss how all of this information has been translated to the high school level – as an athletic trainer.  I was not only surprised by the invitation but feel it is VERY OPPORTUNISTIC for a “boot on the ground” athletic trainer to provide input.  I feel that not only have athletic trainers seemed to be seen and not heard, the vast majority of us practice in the high school setting, where the adolescents are playing sports.  I can assure you I will do my very best to be a quality representative of not only athletic training (it appears I am on the only AT in a speaking role) but those of us working with the most kids/athletes.

Anyhow the cast of speakers/presenters is indeed “star-studded” and even has some opposing view points on where we should be headed; which should make for some quality discussion.  If I can get my technology working and to NYC I will attempt to live blog/tweet the event for those that cannot make it.

Speaking of that, I know that time is short but I encourage anyone who is going to be in NYC during Super Bowl Week try to attend this event.  If there are scribes out there I am sure the wonderful support staff at BSI can arrange for you to cover and meet the star of the show – me, of course – hahahahaha, I kid.  Seriously, you can register HERE and if you have questions feel free to contact them.

I hope to see you all there!

Interesting Take On Tackling

26 Dec

I have been fortunate to be in some great email “groups” with information that surrounds the playing of sports.  Of course I have been attracted to concussion and those ancillary problems surrounding the brain injury.  It not only furthers, the some time outrageous, fodder but it also provides some critical thinking.

Matt Chaney has been doing a great job of circulating information – mainly about football – and from time to time I get some links that I feel would be best shared for “group thought process”.  A quick aside: Chaney’s blog has been removed from cyberspace due to some confounding issues on the user end, but he will dredge up his information in the coming weeks and re-launch his blog.  Back to the post…

Here is how Chaney describes this forthcoming link:

–super piece by a very interesting writer, an outstanding athlete-scribe, Doug Brown in Canada, former CFL D-lineman… he nails NFL rule-making as lousy lipstick on the pig… great points on the folly of ‘proper form’ or Heads Up or ‘safe tackling’ especially in the head-on avenues of football contact, or the ‘allies’ on-field, as Brown refers…. the tunnel effect of forward contact… though I don’t see any wall-in by other players as necessary for a head-on collision; it’s all about angles of intersecting opponents, and all you need are two principals incoming, ballcarrier and tackler, each with his mission…. boom!…. Doug Brown

I share his sentiments on the article, it brings to light some of the things we CANNOT get rid of in current football.  But does that make the game “unsafe”?  That is the penultimate question; further if it is a problem how can it even be solved?

Here is an excerpt from Doug Brown’s article that appeared in the Winnipeg Free Press;

When an offensive and defensive player meet in an alley, the options for tackling from an angle, or putting your head to the side of the ball carrier are absent. Instinct and self preservation in football tells a ball carrier to lower his head and shoulder pads when he anticipates a collision. Hitting a ball carrier above Continue reading

ABC’s ‘This Week’: Football’s Concussion Crisis

24 Dec

First I want to lead this off by saying it is not a “crisis” just for the NFL, or football, this is an issue for everyone.  Once again this provides me the opportunity to say; the injury of concussion is not the problem/elephant in the room, rather it is the mismanagement of those injuries that have created this problems we are facing.

This video is from YouTube and I was tipped off by Dave Pear to its existence.

It is 11 minutes in length but there are some good sound bites in it.  If you can wade your way through the minutia you will see that the repeating issue is what I have stated above.  Basically doing nothing to fix the real problem.

#tbt Post: AAN Concussion Guidelines

12 Dec

This “throwback Thursday” thing is kinda cool for a guy that has a ton of stuff on this site that new people may have missed.  With that I will attempt to drudge up some “oldies-but-goodies” for you the audience.  I am certain I will re-read some of this and laugh at myself or have changed in the way of thinking but I will leave it as it was originally printed.

This week’s #tbt post comes from March of this year (original LINK – you can go there if you want to see original comments).

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Here is the presser for the updated AAN Sports Concussion Guidelines; their guidelines are simple and to the point, via YouTube;

  • No Grading System of concussion
  • 10 day rest period – “key” – Dr. Jeffrey Kutcher
  • Greater risk if you have had a concussion
  • Addressing of youth and recovery
  • Helmets are not the full answer
  • Licensed Health Care Providers should be clearing
  • Repetitive head injuries are bad
  • The discovery and annotation of “Chronic Cognitive Impairment”
  • No single test, CLINICAL assessment
  • “Kids are not little adults.” – Dr. Christopher Giza

Here is the LINK to the Updated Guidelines (can someone give me permission to post it here?)

Here is the LINK to the Sports Concussion Toolkit from AAN

Here is the LINK to the Concussion Quick Check from AAN

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What does this mean in comparison to the Zurich Statement?  That is a great question; Continue reading

Please… Let This Be an Anomaly UPDATED

11 Dec

Updated (19:43 CST with a new email, see below…

There are tons of you that write in, and I do my best to respond.  Then there are some of you that I get an email and I immediately investigate, this email received from a fellow athletic trainer has me scratching my head and hoping this is not the norm (emphasis mine);

Good Morning Dustin:

I was at a wrestling meet to watch my son on Saturday and one of the wrestlers girlfriend was there.  She is in college and her major is biology and exercise science and I am not sure where she goes to school. I see her book is Athletic Injury Management and then I see her study guide.  I see on the study guide a section on concussion and grading of concussions.  I told her that she should inform her instructor that the information is wrong as there is no grading system for concussions anymore.  She said that is what her instructor had said however they still teach the grading because coaches understand the grading and it is to appease the coaches so they know how severe the concussion is.  I just shook my head.

So in some colleges it sounds like grading of concussions is still being taught and if I had to hazard a guess, it is by instructors that do not teach athletic training students.

I just wonder how many other colleges are still teaching the grading systems because that is what coaches understand.

This is an outrage to me.  Why are we convalescing to the coaches “feelings and education”.  Why are we not, as the allied healthcare professional, educating the coaches on what is happening around them.

Sure, the conversations are uncomfortable at first, Continue reading

Brain Injury and Snowboarding: The Crash Reel

10 Dec

Let us take a moment and shift from American Football (thus show) to bring you information about head injuries in other sports.  We have commented before that is not a certain sport problem, rather a societal problem.  Concussions and brain injury occur in every aspect of life, there is no way everyone can be placed in a bubble.

Professional Snowboarder and one time Olympic hopeful, Kevin Pearce, had his bout and run-in with the dangers of any sport.  It will be portrayed in a documentary called “The Crash Reel“;

An escalating rivalry between Kevin and his nemesis Shaun White in the run-up to the 2010 Olympics leaves Shaun on top of the Olympic podium and Kevin in a coma following a training accident in Park City, Utah.  Kevin’s tight-knit Vermont family flies to his side and helps him rebuild his life as a brain injury survivor.  But when he insists he wants to return to the sport he still loves, his family intervenes with his eloquent brother David speaking for all of them when he says, “I just don’t want you to die.” Kevin’s doctors caution him that even a small blow to the head could be enough to kill him. Will Kevin defy them and insist on pursuing his passion?  With his now impaired skills, what other options does he have?  How much risk is too much?

The film is set to release this week and judging from the trailer (seen below) it may be worth watching as we get to see many things;

Watching from the injury to his comeback it will be important to look at how his caregivers (family mainly) deal with the struggles of a high-level “professional” athlete trying to do what he wants to do.  It will also give us a glimpse into the mindset of a professional athlete and why they choose to take the risks they do.  No one should overlook the sacrifices and how hard it is for one to recover from serious brain injury.  Good luck to Kevin and his endeavors.

h/t Broken Brilliant

Ha.

10 Dec

My mom forwarded this comic to me, just thought it would be amusing to put on the site…

In the Bleachers 11-15-13

My Concussion Return to Play Protocol Based on Heart Rates

10 Dec

Dustin Fink:

A very specific and objective way to monitor Return to Play. We need more of this to be shared in the community. It may not fit your budget or model, but at least we have some examples to look at… Great Job @IronmanLongRunr

Originally posted on In Training:

Concussion is obviously a major buzz word, and if you’re in a medical profession and or working with athletes it is more than that, it is something we have to work with. Unfortunately, it is something that we still don’t know a lot about. We are steadily learning more and adjusting how we treat and handle them on a regular basis. There are many good guidelines out there for coaches, PE teachers, athletic trainers, nurses, doctors, etc. to use, and they are good, but they could be better.

In June of 2012 New York State passed The Concussion Management Awareness Act which went into effect on July 1st, 2012. This law led to the development of The Guidelines for Concussion Management in the School Setting. These guidelines were based on the 2008 Zurich Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport. A new consensus statement came out in…

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