Archive | In My Own Words RSS feed for this section

General Dentistry Publishes a Bombshell About Mouth Guards (ADDENDUM)

5 May

Is it a bombshell or is it just a plain dud?  I say bombshell, but not in a good way for anyone involved with this “research”.

Last week I was inundated with emails regarding this “new” research about mouth guards and concussions.  There were roughly 16 emails in a one hour time span; some wanting comment, some telling me I have been wrong all along, some promoting the research.  This was a “huge” development in my area and my little corner in the blogosphere.  To fully understand perhaps some history is needed (“mouth gear” search on this blog) when it comes to my feelings on mouth gear and concussions.  Here are some selected comments attributed to me;

The basic fundamentals we should be cognizant of here are: concussion is a BRAIN injury, the BRAIN floats inside skull, Physics dictates that the BRAIN will move depending on the forces applied to the skull/head (not always from a blow to that area), mouth gear cannot stop the BRAIN from moving, mouth gear cannot attenuate any forces to the skull/head that are not in the oral region, mouth gear does nothing for the skull/head when forces are placed on it in rotational, angular, acceleration or deceleration fashion.

Now that we have that all out-of-the-way this is the General Dentistry article I was asked to comment on.  On face value and from a “peer-reviewed” angle it Continue reading

About these ads

Getting A Bit Fidgety On A “Snow Day”

27 Jan

It’s not actually snowing, but no school today because of -20’s windchill.  With my kids out and some time to relax, I have found myself looking back and getting a bit nervous for the upcoming week.

It was a heckuva weekend as an athletic trainer and this week is shaping up to be a big week in terms of concussion education for me.  As you may have already noticed I am heading to New York tomorrow to be part of the #C4CT Concussion Summit, both as a live blog feed and a panelist.  I hope many can make the event, and many more learn from what I can get down on the interwebs.

Let us first reexamine the life of an athletic trainer this past weekend…

It started Friday night as the boy’s team was on the road and I caught wind (we seem to have a ton of sources as AT’s) of a collision between two players in the game.  One of them had to go to the ER for some sewing work the other was ruled out by the AT with a concussion.  So began my communication and information gathering well into the late night – and I wasn’t even there.

Saturday came with anticipation of seeing the injured players, fully assessing and beginning a recovery plan – while attending to a high school wrestling dual tournament.  I don’t think many non-AT’s appreciate the juggling act necessary to even take a leak during these type of events let alone get some food, but now throw in two separate concussion evaluations and meetings with parents it becomes a minor miracle.  However, I would be remiss if I didn’t have an outstanding volunteer first responder and student AT.

After testing and making the decision to let one player travel but not play and the other to not travel at all, it was time to focus on the wrestling.  It was a very good set of matches with an unlikely victor as a team.  However, in the aftermath there was a bit of false bravado by an athlete as a fist and arm went through a double-paned glass window – the ones with wires in them – and then extracted said arm.

Having an athlete present with possibly the “ugliest” injury you have ever seen can be a bit discomforting, which it was as blood was not only leaking out it was pulsing out of the large gash.  Some how, some way when controlling the bleeding there was not one drop on my clothes, an absolute miracle.  The stories being related after the fact have been from preposterous to accurate, the net-net was that we had a life-threatening injury and it was taken care of quickly and professionally.  On top of that the athlete was all taken care of and went home that night, a very lucky kid in the face of doing something very dumb.

Sunday was not a rest day as 11 hours in the gym was on the docket again, for the little kids wrestling individual tournament.  I actually learned a ton from being there (only had 5 bloody noses and one “injury).  I learned that if kids/parents want kids to be in a “collision-type” sport that demands physical and mental discipline that wrestling may be the answer, over football for as young as 5.

Although school is out today my job is still in full swing.  Beyond the paperwork from the weekend I had to figure out a way to meet with the injuries at school and talk with parents.  Set up doctors appointments.  Track an injured athlete trough surgery.  Call coaches and admin to remind them of my absence.  And get the training room cleaned, set-up and directions for the sub AT coming in for me.

Oh, there is this blog too, which will have breaking news today.

As I am writing this I only wanted to share what an athletic trainer does.  Sure, because I post here makes me not the “normal” AT but there are many athletic trainers out there that do this and much more than me on a daily basis.  It is very important to me to share my experiences so you can see how valuable AT’s are.

Parting, I would like to now extend an invitation to Commissioner Rodger Goodell to meet with me while I’m in New York.  I am actually staying a block or so away from NFL HQ.  So, Mr. Goodell (or representatives) just give me a shout in my in box! hahahaha.  Can’t say I didn’t try!

The OTL Investigation on ‘Heads Up’ Football

14 Jan

It may have slipped some of your reading or viewing, but ESPN’s Outside the Lines did a piece on the USA Football Heads Up Program.  The article and video were presented last Sunday morning – I cannot find a YouTube version of the OTL show but you can find that part HERE.  The seven minute presentation is great for a quick overview of the issues ESPN has found.

For more in-depth coverage you should read the article by Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada, the same authors that penned League of Denial.  There are some wonderful points brought to light by the Fainaru’s;

The program teaches concussion awareness and proper helmet fitting, but its central tenet is the soon-to-be trademarked Heads Up Tackling program. When executed properly, proponents say, Heads Up Tackling literally takes the head out of the game. Players are taught to keep their heads up and lead with their shoulders when tackling.

[...]

But critics view Heads Up as a cynical marketing ploy — a repackaging of old terminology to reassure parents at a time the sport is confronting a widening health crisis.

There is a reason I have been “relatively” quiet on this topic; it’s because they are doing some very good things in the way of education and helmet fitting.  As you may know I am huge on the topic of awareness when it comes to concussions.  I have stated many times that the injury itself is not the “ice burg we can see above the water” rather it’s the mismanagement of the concussion that is the massive ice chunk we cannot see from the surface.

That being said, with the actual tackling technique being taught I too feel this is a repackaging of an old mantra.  Rules were even put in place as early as the 70’s to accomplish this task of taking the head out of the game.  Face tackling, spearing and butt blocking all have been on the books as penalties to help avoid using the head as a weapon.

The problem being that those are not called very often, when they are called they are inconsistent at best, and what has it done for the game over nearly 40 years?  I am not nearly as critical as others;  Continue reading

PUMP THE BRAKES, Everyone!

4 Dec

I am a bit on edge this fine, foggy-impending-wintery-weather, day.  No, it’s not the great coffee I am drinking now and the nice jog I had clearly didn’t ease my current frustration.  This forthcoming “strongtake” may get my ass in hot water with some readers, but so be it.

People need to calm down, slow down, take a step back, reflect and realize some important things.  Before I go further understand that I have tried to be as “neutral” as possible – a simple athletic trainer that sees concussions on an intimate level from occurrence to recovery.  I have had 13 myself.  This post is something that apparently has boiled up from all the press clippings I have read and feedback I am getting.  Not one person, entity, sport, or profession is my target here; these are observations and opinions (in my most succinct way possible).

First of all, concussions are not a football problem, they are not a soccer problem, they are not a doctors problem, they are a societal problem.  Rightly so, football in America gets the mass attention, because it happens there more than any other sport out there (don’t waste my time with the skewed numbers of other sports and genders).  With that being said because of the higher incidence in football that does not mean the sport as a whole needs to be banished.  You know very well where I stand on this but I will spell it out for those new here.

Professional football is a different animal from the other forms of the sport, mainly because they are grown adults making informed decisions about their health.  And they get paid to do it, other than providing immediate safety for the concussed players and proper information about the injury, short and long-term, they can and should be able to make their own decisions.  However, this does not indemnify those players or the sanctioning bodies from having some casual responsibility for the emulation of the game at the lower levels.  A clear line must be drawn between amateur and professional medical care; for concussions and all other injuries.  Remember that the professionals have much greater medical care available to them, and if you think that is unfair well too bad, that’s life and where the money is.  Professional football holds a certain responsibility to inform its fans and future players of the risks and rewards of the sport.

As for the lower levels, with proper coaching and medical care/coverage I feel there is a place for this sport as we know it.  Unfortunately as we trickle down in age the participation numbers go way up and at the bottom, youth, is where we have the greatest disconnect from coaching and medical coverage/care.  Because of this and other factors I am of the ilk that kids should wait until the arbitrary age of 14 or freshman in high school to begin full collision football.  Believe it or not this has to do with more than just concussions, in my opinion.  And here is where my first beef is coming from.  Continue reading

So Simple It’s Stupid

9 Sep

I have posted many a video about concussions here on the blog but this one (thanks to Tommy Dean) may be the best for its pure simplicity and message about management;

People need to understand that concussions don’t have to involve a hit to the head.  I have seen throngs of people on Twitter and other places not grasping this.  Perhaps none more so in the product development sector; those very intuitive people with good ideas that think protecting the head will reduce concussions.  Be it a helmet addition, or better helmet, or those that want to remove helmets from the game, what they fail to grasp is that linear hits to the head with linear forces alone do not constitute the majority of concussion sequale.  The concussion comes as a result of a constellation of factors; the biggest of which is the acceleration/deceleration of the head, followed closely by the shearing (due to angular and rotational forces) of the head.  If you notice most mechanisms of injury one would easily note that knocks to the head with limited movement of the head itself, are not the vast majority of concussions seen.  The hits a person takes in sports and LIFE that are unanticipated and have multiple vectors is where we get a lot of concussions from.

For a better visual, if I were to say to you I am going to punch you in the face from the right side, and you had a chance to brace for it, there is a good chance you could absorb that blow with little to no problems.  However if I were to not say a word and walk up and hit you in the same spot with the same force, the chances you will be “hurt” are much greater.  When you anticipated the hit you would have braced and made the force almost strictly linear, with little rotation due to your neck muscles…  Where as, the sucker punch would move your head sideways and back; quickly accelerating your head then suddenly it would be decelerated by the spine range of motion limits.

I hope this has provided some positive learning for everyone…

Nick Mercer: Bubble Times – Is it going to pop?

21 Feb

Continuing with my analogy from my last post, “Brain injuries and pro contact sports: Bubble times” , in which I compared the concussion issue in pro sports with the financial crisis, I thought I’d try to complete the comparison without, hopefully, forecasting the end of contact sports, notably the NFL and football in general.

In my previous post I said that fans, teams, and leagues play the same role in the concussion issue as the banks/financial institutions did in the recent financial crisis; interested only in their short-term benefit, making them unintentionally complicit in the looming collapse. Players are like the borrowers; they want to play the sport they love and make lots of money doing it. Consequences be damned. Just like people wanted to buy houses and a bunch of other stuff, not thinking, wishing away the potentially negative long-term consequences. It’s about the looming collapse that I will write.

Since my last post, I have listened to Malcolm Gladwell talk about the undesirable, yet inevitable decline of football. Then I read an article on the Oxford University Press blog Why football cannot last’ discussing Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) – a neurological disorder resulting from repetitive blows to the head. It got me thinking about the optimism shown at the end of my last post – had I not considered the situation fully? Was it simply wishful thinking?

Gladwell makes a convincing case Continue reading

Call it what you want, just don’t panic

25 Oct

Confidence, arrogance, or indifference. It doesn’t matter which term you use, as long as you understand what it means to show any  of those characteristics. The popular conception is that confidence encapsulates valuing yourself, being proud of what you’ve accomplished and ‘standing up for yourself’. The unfortunate circumstance is that the word ‘confidence’ (as used in the phrase, ‘Have confidence in yourself’) appears to have been corrupted and used to connote an arrogant, narcissistic attitude. People who have been affected by brain injury, or any other health condition that has had detrimental effects on self esteem, are encouraged to  show confidence, with the hope that they will feel good about themselves when they go out into society. This is well-meaning, but perhaps, not the best way to go about instilling true confidence.

Confidence is defined by the Oxford Dictionary as: the feeling or belief that one can have faith in or rely on someone or something; the state of feeling certain about the truth of something; a feeling of self-assurance arising from an appreciation of one’s own abilities or qualities.

That is what confidence means. What’s often impressed on people – recovering from brain injury or not – is that Continue reading

Why do I write?

17 Oct

Nick Mercers provides some insight into why he chooses to write for us and his blog.

Because, as much as it lets others ask questions, it encourages me to ask questions of myself.

Granted, I have always questioned myself, I’m hyper-self-critical. In general, it’s not necessarily a good thing. I hesitate or stop completely. I waste opportunities. I’ll pass up a good chance (with a woman, for a job,…) for a safer, if not longer, chance. However, in writing, my exhaustive self-analysis, is probably beneficial. It means I take longer to write, because I’m always correcting what I wrote and how I wrote it. There aren’t many sentences in this post that haven’t been ‘renovated’ in some way. That’s not to say there aren’t mistakes, or that I catch-all of those errors on the first, second, or even third read. I’m cognizant, but maybe not enough, of the propensity of my self-criticism to take the emotive punch out of what I write. So I try to guard against that. I try to be open, and I hope that shows through, but since this personality trait has been with me my whole life, it’s not completely natural for me to silence it. It is at constant odds with the my ‘newly’ acquired (9 years ago) impulsive nature.

My impulsive side has not completely balanced out my patient and measured side (or vice versa), but it has made some headway. That said, I’m certainly calmer and less anxious than I was before my brain injury, which could have more to do with the severity of my brain injury than with the injury itself, however I don’t know, I’m just speculating, and I don’t have any medical information to back up such a claim. See that? That was Continue reading

In Her Own Words: Rachel Abrams

9 Oct

To anyone else September 22 is any other day, for me it is forever etched in my mind; I call it the devil’s day. Many people are slowly beginning to understand concussions, I want to make sure that the world knows how serious they are, how simple it is to get one and what you can go through if you get one. I will do this by explaining my story.

I was a rough tough athletic kid in high school; who had a few injuries during that time, fractured my back twice, tore my quad and fractured my orbital bone. Nothing kept me out for that long; I did rehabilitation, rested for a short time and did physical therapy. I never thought anything of concussions, I was uneducated of this injury. I was one of those kids that thought, “Oh it’s just a bump on the head, I’ll be fine.” I graduated high school and went to a community college upstate, I was going to play soccer and softball there. I was one of the goalkeeper’s on the women’s soccer team and was having the time of my life. What is better for a kid whose life was sports, I loved every part of it, that was what I was known for and who I was. Then came September 22, 2010, when my life changed.

It was during one of our games, I was in goal and my team was up by a few goals if I remember correctly. Sometimes it is hard to keep complete focus when you do not get much action in goal. It was a corner kick from the opposing team, it came into my area and I went out to catch it in the air. It was not a very hard kick, I misjudged it a bit and caught it against the side of my face and then brought it into my hands. It hurt a little bit but I was fine and kept playing, finishing out the rest of the game. Then came the headaches, I didn’t think anything of it because I thought, “oh that barely hit me and hardly hurt, it’s just a little knock to the head.” I practiced the next day and the next 3 days after the hit, the headaches were getting worse. A friend suggested that I go see the athletic trainer and that I may have a concussion. I refused to go see him, I believed that I just had some small headaches and he would take me out when I didn’t need to be sat out. I was forced to go see him and got checked out, I was taken out, just as a precautionary. Then it got worse, my symptoms got worse, now experiencing nausea and increased headaches. I went to the emergency room at a local hospital where they did either a MRI or CAT scan, I don’t remember exactly. Everything came out fine, the hospital gave me medication for my headaches and nausea and I went back to my dorm. This was on Friday September 24, 2010; my mom came up to see my game that Saturday September 25, 2010, when I told her that I was not playing because of a suspected concussion. I ended up having to go home that Monday Continue reading

Still Relating

9 Oct

A few weeks ago I wrote a post entitled Relating. It was about the new (past 9 years, since my brain injury) difficulty I had relating to others. I discuss how it’s tough to convey the experience and how great the help from my friends and family was. Recently, I read an article, entitled Voyages in Concussion Land: the homeless, Sidney Crosby and me by Tabatha Southey in The Globe and Mail on Friday, Oct 5, 2012. In it, Tabatha wonders about, “the dissociation many concussion sufferers experience”.

Immediately I thought ‘Dissociation! That’s the word! Perfect.’ However, being my critical, nit-picking-self, I soon found reasons why ‘dissociation’ wasn’t, in fact, ‘perfect’ to describe me. This bit of criticism was made much easier by my recent trip to Toronto and London, Ontario to see my best friends from university. We had a great time! Not only that, I got to see their children (except one). Dissociated could in no way describe how I felt at any time that weekend. Even though all the guys are married and almost all have children, it was such an easy, if not natural, situation that it was as though we still all lived in the same house (Granted, their actual houses now are much, much, cleaner – I can’t emphasize that enough).

Then I came home and this past weekend had a much different, yet also easy/natural time at a friend’s party. So, I’ve started thinking  Continue reading

Limiting Head Trauma is Logical

31 May

The research is starting to come in; the problem is that results and conclusions bring more questions that should be answered.  Naturally some will look at early evidence and make a 180 degree change on their attitudes about certain things.  We are talking about concussions and the research associated with it.  Unfortunately there is plenty of anecdotal and observational cases that sear into our memory, this perhaps shape our thought process.  Along with that there is gathering evidence that supports some sort of process change in how we handle this particular injury.

The need to make change is upon us, that cannot be debated; what can be debated is how or what the changes should be.  I recently read an article where Micky Collins of UPMC said something to the effect of current concussion concern is like a pendulum that has swung all the way to the other side.  Although the changes in sports and activities has certainly not taken that full swing the other way, the pendulum is on the way.  His feelings, like mine is that there is no evidence to suggest that a full swing to the other side is warranted, rather there needs to be competent and complete understanding of what we are facing.  Rather than making full sweeping changes that would be akin to digging up your backyard to rid your self of a mole; when placing traps and poisons and maybe only having to dig up a small section would fix the problem.

There are definitely things we can do as parents, players, coaches, researchers, doctors and concerned people in general to make a dent in the issue.  If we find that the changes are not working then taking another aggressive step may be necessary.  I guess the reason for the above rant is to reinforce the need for changes, but the right changes.  (As I wrote the last sentence I realized how do we know if the changes are the “right” ones; I guess we don’t but certainly what is happening now needs attention).

One of the small changes that can be made is very obvious to me; Continue reading

Open Letter and Proposals to IHSA about Concussions

15 May

I have been working on this letter for a little while but was really spurred to action by the parent in Maryland, Tom Hearn who discussed his concerns with the local school board.  I have tried and tried to use the “chain-of-command” with these thoughts and ideas, however at every step I got the feeling I would have to go alone on this, so I have.  This letter may or may not reflect the opinions of my employer, high school, athletic training sanctioning bodies, or others I am involved with.  This letter is from a concerned individual who feels I can spread the message effectively by these means.  I have emailed the letter, proposals and the Sports Legacy Institute Hit Count White Paper to all Executive Directors and Board of Directors of the Illinois High School Association.

OPEN LETTER

May 15, 2012

Illinois High School Association
c/o: Marty Hickman, Executive Director
2175 McGraw Drive
Bloomington, IL 61704-6011
(309) 663-7479 – fax

Dear IHSA – Executive Directors, Board of Directors and Sports Med Advisory Board:

I am writing this letter to address the growing concern of concussions in sports, mainly in football.  It should be noted that football is not the only sport with a concussion issue; however this sport combines the highest participation, highest risk, and highest visibility.  This letter should not be construed as an attack on the sport of football, but rather a way to keep the sport continuing to grow.

As a licensed and practicing Athletic Trainer, researcher, commenter, father, and survivor of too many concussions, I feel that in order to keep the sports we love, proactive steps must be taken.  Often being proactive is a painful process and easily dismissed because of the trouble it will cause.  I urge all involved to think about what the future of all sports will be if nothing is done.

The Illinois State Legislature with the IHSA took the initiative by creating a mechanism of concussion education and awareness in response to the mounting scientific evidence of potential long-term impairments resulting from mishandling of this injury.  However, this only represents a first step in the process; passing out a flyer or having parents and athletes initial that they have read the information is one small element of the issue.  Another crucial element of the issue is coaching. We must ensure that those we entrust with the care and leadership of our children understand Continue reading

Former Players Reaction to Seau

3 May

With all the illogical conclusions that are happening in the press there are some small positives already.  The biggest of which, less than 24 hours after the untimely death of a great individual is the former players speaking out about depression and post-career condition.  No longer has it become taboo to talk of depression.

Now players need to take stock of their physical and mental health, some players are such as Emmitt Smith;

“Depression & suicide are serious matters and we as current and former NFL players should demand better treatment. Lack of info … no more!!!,” former Dallas Cowboys Hall of Fame running back Emmitt Smith said on his Twitter account.

“And for you current players who think this issue doesn’t effect u. Get your head out of your but. Where u r 2day was his (Seau’s) yesterday.”

In the same article James Johnston Jr., had this comment on former NFL’ers; Continue reading

RIP #55… Everyone Hold your Horses #C4CT

2 May

With the tragic news of the death, at his own hands, of Junior Seau along with the peculiarly similar initial circumstances of Dave Duerson everyone needs to step back.  Yes, the very first thought that crossed my mind was Dave Duerson upon hearing the reports, mainly by Twitter.  However, what we must collectively do now is allow the process to unfold.

Not unlike sustaining a concussion the news is just the beginning.  When someone sustains a concussion often there are instant leaps to conclusions about time missed, long-term effects, and safety.  With a concussion it is a process, after time is allowed to properly asses the situation, create a plan and implement it there is nothing more to note other than it is a concussion.

And just like concussions people act in different ways, there is no rhyme or reason for many of these tragic situations, often it is because one has not had the proper education and levity of the situation.

I would just like to caution EVERYONE, let the process begin without jumping to conclusions.  In due time we will find out all the necessary information.  I for one hope against all hope that this has nothing to do with his brain health.

Thank You. #C4CT

Another Lawsuit

20 Jan

I received this press release from the law firm representing the newest of the former NFL players filing suit for damages for long-term problems associated with concussions (commentary follows);

Locks Law Firm Files Class Action Suit Against NFL Regarding Head Injuries

and Concussions on behalf of Former Players

Includes Three Former Philadelphia Eagles: Ron Solt, Joe Panos and Rich Miano

Philadelphia – Jan. 19, 2012 – Locks Law Firm attorneys Gene Locks, Michael  Leh, and David  Langfitt filed a class action lawsuit yesterday in Philadelphia against the NFL on behalf of all former NFL players, including seven named  players and four spouses, all of whom are the class representatives. The named players include former Philadelphia Eagles Ron Solt, Joe Panos, and Rich Miano. The suit charges that the NFL and other defendants intentionally and fraudulently misrepresented and/or concealed medical evidence about the short- and long-term risks regarding repetitive traumatic brain injury and concussions and failed to warn players that they risked permanent brain damage if they returned to play too soon after sustaining a concussion.

Ron Solt, age 50, Continue reading

Recent Trend

4 Jan

The real job of this author not only includes being an athletic trainer for a local high school, but also doing rehabilitation on the entire spectrum of the population.  However, from time-to-time I am called upon to be a physician extender in a sports medicine doctors office.  The past few weeks I have been doing that more frequently and have noticed a very surprising trend.

Granted there is no “scientific evidence” of this trend, rather just my observation and upon asking questions to the doctor and the rest of the regular staff, they too have noticed relatively the same thing.

As we have progressed in the concussion era the doctor that we work for has been near the front on the concussion issue.  To his credit he used all the resources in the program to develop this progressive attitude and has taken all of his information along with others and developed a comprehensive concussion program.  When he started many, including some athletic trainers in the sports med program were in disagreement with the longevity and “conservative” nature of the treatment/management.  That quickly subsided with much of the evidence we have seen in the recent year, but it never really translated to acceptance among local coaches, school administrations, and players/parents.

All of the original skepticism about concussion care has slowly been washed away and this doctor has been accepted as one of the “go-to” guys in the area for this injury.  This is not the trend I speak of, although it is very nice to see; all the hard work of the athletic trainers has begun to sink in.

Rather the trend I am beginning to see is something mirrored in the national/international press Continue reading

NHL Concussion Thoughts

29 Dec

Recently there has been a spike in awareness and number of concussions in the National Hockey League.  Last year we began compiling the injuries in our database to see where the sport stands (we also do NFL, NCAA football, and Aussie Rules Football).  When Sidney Crosby sustained his initial concussion in the Winter Classic last year it seemed that NHL has begun to take notice.

It was refreshing to see The Star of the NHL deal with the brain injury with some transparency, although he endured some criticism what Crosby did was set into motion the awareness of concussions.  Last season prior to the new year it was very difficult to find actual listed concussions; they were veiled in “upper body” or “undisclosed” listings.  In some cases the injury was improperly reported as a neck or shoulder injury; a sign that the concussion was either a) not understood (unlikely) or b) needed to be hidden.

Before you read on it is important to understand the position of the blog and this author about concussions.

Concussions, brain injuries, are an inherent part of collision sports.  There is very little in the way of equipment that can prevent concussions, the only way to impact a positive change (see decrease) is to address the culture and mechanics of sports.  This does not mean that professional sports should be outlawed, rather subtly changed to protect those that play, not only for the immediate time, but for the long-term health of the athletes.  With this; Continue reading

A Concussion Survivor

16 Nov

Drew is the son of Tracey Mayer – one of our Parent Advocates – and like John Gonoude a person that has overcome the stigma of concussion.  Not only is it a real brain injury, not treating it correctly can have life long effects for more people than we care to admit.  As Drew finds time he will send us updates, we hope this avenue will help him as well.

When my mom asked me to write for the blog, I knew instantly that I was interested but the first few times I sat down to write about it, things became tougher for me than I had thought.  Although I have had so much support and worked on moving forward from my freshman incident, this whole situation continues to be a sensitive topic for me to talk about.

As my senior year progresses, everything has been moving more smoothly than ever.  Starting off the year I still continued to set my standards high; to keep improving in my classes.  Just in case I needed a little GPA boost, I had taken a couple AP classes for the first time in my 4 years of high school – unlike many of my friends who decided to have a blow off schedule.  This was more of something that would just Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 8,283 other followers